The #1 Guitar Method for Learning 6th Licks

The 6th Interval (also known as the inverted third), is an amazing - must learn - guitar sound for all types of guitar soloing in all music styles. And, it's application is incredibly  versatile since it can be used in Major keys, Minor keys, as well as, with Blues harmony and modes...


If you’ve ever tried to make sense of the 6th interval, but perhaps met with failure. I have great news, this lesson, we’ll clear up all your confusion with the 6th interval and you’ll be applying it easily - in no time flat…

WATCH THE VIDEO:





Viewing the 6th Interval Reference Point (MAJOR):
To establish a reference point for linking the 6th intervals, (the diatonic 6th intervals that you want to use tied to a key center), you'll need a starting point for the reference. We will establish that starting point by way of a common chord pattern.

Major Key Reference Chord (5th String):
The 5th string root, Major key reference chord will be a, "Pattern #1 - Major Triad," (i.e., Intermediate Guitar Program). Within this Major chord, we have a "Minor 6th" interval.

Major Key Reference Chord (4th String):
The 4th string root, Major key reference chord will be a, "Pattern #4 (alt.) - Major Triad," (i.e., Intermediate Guitar Program). Within this Major chord, we have a "Minor 6th" interval.

Major Key - 6th Interval Harmonized Along the Neck:
Once you've established your starting point reference from the chord shapes shown above, learn the harmony associated off of the upper string's scale layout. An example of a "Major" key built between the 4th to 2nd string is shown below.

Complete Harmony for 6th Intervals on 4th to 2nd string (key of "C Major")...




Viewing the 6th Interval Reference Point (MINOR):
The same approach that we used with Major key references, can also be applied to Minor key 6th interval references. However, within the Minor chord we now have a "Major 6th" interval.

Minor Key Reference Chord (5th String):
The 5th string root, Minor key reference chord will be a, "Pattern #1 - Minor Triad," (i.e., Intermediate Guitar Program). Within this Minor chord, we have a "Major 6th" interval.


Minor Key Reference Chord (4th String):
The 4th string root, Minor key reference chord will be a, "Pattern #4 (alt.) - Minor Triad," (i.e., Intermediate Guitar Program). Within this Minor chord, we have a "Major 6th" interval.


Minor Key - 6th Interval Harmonized Along the Neck:
Once you've established a starting point reference from the minor chord shapes (shown above), learn the harmony associated off of the upper string's scale layout. An example of a "Minor" key (built between the 4th to 2nd string ) is shown below.

Complete Harmony for 6th Intervals between 4th to 2nd string (key of "C Minor")...





6th Interval Application:
These 6th interval shapes can operate in either Major or Minor tonality. So, in getting started with some application, let’s begin with an lick from a Major key. Here’s an example in the key of, “D Major.”

 click the image above to enlarge full-screen

Next, let’s work out a guitar lick for application within a minor tonality context. Here’s a 6th interval lick in the key of, “D Minor.”

click the image above to enlarge full-screen




Expanding the Use of 6ths:
Anything that you study on guitar, (especially scales, arpeggios and interval concepts), should be expanded into further directions for application into as many musical directions as possible.

I’d like to suggest that you use your basic knowledge of music theory and try expanding the application of these 6th interval concepts further along to areas like Modes and Blues based guitar riffs.

One of the best ideas to head into with these 6th intervals are Blues licks. In fact, Blues turnarounds will often use the 6th interval as a way to resolve a Blues melody statement.

Check out this Blues-based turnaround that applies 6th intervals in a key of “A” Blues.

Blues Turnaround with the 6th:



CONCLUSION:
As you can tell, these 6th intervals are fantastic when it comes to using them for licks found within any type of tonality, (or for use in almost any music style as well).

Learn the layout of the 6th and learn how the integration principles for applying 6th intervals work musically. It will probably take a little time to fully understand the basic theory behind their use, (in both Major and Minor tonality).

There will also be some time required to be able to nail down the physical technique of playing 6th intervals on the guitar. But, I think you’ll have fun practicing them, and you’ll definitely have fun when you start applying them in songs and especially in your guitar solo.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Well, I'd like to end the discussion by saying, thanks for joining me... If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership.

When you want more, you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium lesson package and start studying the guitar courses I've organized for the members of my website.

Also, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on all of this in the comment section below. If you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more. Thanks again and we'll catch up next week, for another episode of the, "Guitar Blog Insider."

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

0 comments:

Post a Comment