ONE Clever Trick All Guitar Players Should Know!

I don’t care what you have planned for your next guitar practice session, but you better make room for what I’m going to show you in this important video guitar lesson. In it, I’m going to reveal to you the number one thing you need to do every single time you practice a new; scale, riff or lick...




Some guitar students may have been given alternative advice, where they've been told that learning alternate versions of scales, licks and riffs isn't necessary. I’m going to tell you, (if this sounds like advice that you've been given), what you have been told is just bad advice.





DEFINE WHAT and WHERE YOU PLAY:
I’m going to get right to it today, there is one clever trick you need to be doing every time you work on laying out anything on your guitar neck. And, that is you've gotta take into consideration how every idea that you learn can be played along the guitar in two directions of travel.

These different directions are;
  • Upward toward the guitar’s body
  • Down to the direction of the guitar’s head-stock

With every riff you play, and every solo, (or guitar lick) you learn, you’d better understand how the part that you're studying on guitar would sit on the guitar in both directions, (upward and downwards the neck).

Some people might say, "look I’ve been taught to only learn a riff or a solo exactly as it was played on the original recording by the band."

Okay fair enough, but, if you only do that, you’re going to miss out on how to expand those ideas on the fingerboard. Also, if you only learned a part as to how it was played on the recording you’re just limiting yourself to one pattern on the frets.

Working out ideas so that you have them understood in only one way will unfortunately limit your guitar knowledge and that type of study will leave you on a shaky foundation.

In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to take scale patterns plus guitar licks and lay them out on the guitar so that you can learn how to view all the notes in both directions.




Example 1).
Our first example is going to be using the shape of a “D Major” scale pattern traveling toward the guitar’s body, playing notes located on the lower register strings. The pattern that we’re going to use - looks like this…

Scale Scale Diagram


Next, let's establish a melodic phrase using this scale pattern on the neck. That way what you can start to better understand is more of the playing options that this neck layout of our example scale can offer us with the music that we play.

Guitar Lick Example









Example 2).
Our second example is going to again use the shape of a “D Major” scale pattern but this time traveling toward the guitar’s head-stock.

Guitar Scale Diagram



Here’s a melodic idea so we can find out what this direction of scale tones will be able to offer us in our playing.

Guitar Lick Example




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I wanted to take a minute to let you know, that if you want to learn even more about scales and theory I have a great offer for you.

With any donation over $5, or any merchandise purchase from my Tee-Spring store, I’ll send you free copies of THREE of my most popular digital handouts.

One is called, “Harmonized Arpeggio Drills” (it’ll train you on developing your diatonic arpeggios).

Another one is my “Barre Chord” Handout which includes a page showing all the key signatures along with a chord progression that applies barre chords.

Plus, you’ll get my Notation Pack! It has 8 pages of important guitar worksheets for notating anything related to; music charts, guitar chord diagrams, and TAB.

As a BONUS, (from my "Over 40 and Still Can't Play a Scale" video), I'll also throw in a breakdown of all of the chords that are diatonic to the "F Major" scale.

As an EXTRA BONUS for my Phrygian Dominant video, I'll also throw in a breakdown featuring all of the chords that are diatonic to the Phrygian Dominant scale.

Just send me an email off of the contact page of CreativeGuitarStudio.com to let me know about either your donation or your Merchandise purchase and I’ll email you those digital handouts within 24 hrs.    

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Example 3).
Our third example is going to use the shape of a “B Minor” scale pattern on the upper strings and traveling toward the guitar’s body.

Guitar Scale Diagram



Here’s a melodic idea so we can find out what this direction of scale tones will be able to offer us in our playing.

Guitar Lick Example








Example 4).
Our last example is going to once more use the shape of a “B Minor” scale pattern on the upper strings but now traveling toward the guitar’s headstock.

Guitar Scale Diagram



Here’s a melodic idea so we can find out what this direction of scale tones will be able to offer us in our playing.


Guitar Lick Example




CONCLUSION:
All of the world’s greatest guitar players have worked this one clever trick into their practice routine. And, if you can also start to do this with every; scale, riff, lick and solo that you study, you’re going to develop an awareness for how these ideas sit on the neck that goes well beyond the knowledge that you’d get from only learning something in one particular way.

You gotta include some other directions of study when it comes to every musical phrase that you practice as a guitar player.

So, make sure that with every; scale, riff, lick and solo that you practice you explore how the notes sit on the neck toward the guitar’s body, as well as, toward the guitars headstock.

And, as you do this, you’ll really build your neck knowledge for notes on the fret-board. And, this will ultimately have you twice as aware of how music operates on the guitar – making you twice the guitar player in the process.


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