MUSIC READING 004: Mid Register (Keys: G, D, A, E)

February 22, 2019:
MUSIC READING 004:
MUSIC READING 004: Mid Register (Keys: D, G, A, E)

 
 NEW  Learn advanced music reading skills and abilities in this Creative Guitar Studio sheet music reading course  designed to help guitar players further develop their traditional music reading skills across all fretting positions...


Lesson 004 of Music Reading Lesson four "Music Reading" maintains further study located within the mid-region of the guitar neck. Four reading exercises use four different sharp key signatures that are located within the mid-register region of the neck's "4th and 5th" playing positions.

**DISCLAIMER**
This guitar music reading course is not designed to be used as a "beginners" reading curriculum.

If you have no prior music reading experience on the guitar, it is strongly advised to first study the Creative Guitar - Introductory Guitar Program, as well as, the Intermediate Guitar Program.

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(1). Part one, of lesson four Music Reading, studies exercises designed to develop reading skills in the 4th reading position within the key of "G Major." Scale tone range is established from the low 6th-string "A", up to the high 1st-string "C" at the 8th fret.

(2). Part two, introduces the key of "D Major" across the 4th and 5th positions. Scale tone range is established from the low 6th-string "A", up to the high 1st-string "B" at the 7th fret. The practice piece also includes a low "G" at the third fret.

(3). Part three, introduces reading in the key of "A Major" with notes located within the 4th position. In the exercise piece, scale tone range covers notes from the low 6th-string "G#", up to the high 1st-string "B" at the 7th fret.

(4). Part four, introduces reading in the key of "E Major" with notes once again located entirely within 4th position. Scale tone range is again established from the low 6th-string "G#", up to the high 1st-string "B" at the 7th fret.

(5). Reading Exercise: The low register summary piece for lesson four is a 16-bar melody that blends the 4th and 5th positions together covering all of this lessons key signatures (G, D, A and E).
 

NOTE: Paid members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start your practice of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to all of the video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Study the notes to staff layout of the key of "G" major across the 4th position region.


PART TWO:  Study the notes to staff layout of the key of "D" major across 4th and 5th position.




PART THREE:
Study the notes to staff layout of the key of "A" across the 4th position.


PART FOUR:  Study the notes to staff layout of the key of "E" across 4th position. 

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Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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3 Fingerpicked Patterns (Jazz Chords)

Fingerpicked chord phrases sound fantastic. And, when this style of guitar playing is blended alongside of jazz chords building up a beautiful jazz harmony we end up with a combination of two really cool guitar playing ideas. Regardless of your playing level, this lesson will help you gain new insight into fingerpicking patterns for jazz chords...




This lesson is going to combine two topics that guitar players love messing around with - fingerpicked patterns and jazz chords.

We’re going to start out by learning an easy finger-picked pattern played between two common jazz chord shapes. 

And then, from there on we’re going to progress into slightly more complex patterns that add more chords and also a slightly more involved finger-picked pattern.

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Example 1).
Simple picked pattern (2 chords)




Example 2).
String Skip Pattern (2 Chords)




Example 3).
Complex Pattern (3 Chords)






LEARNING /PLAYING /PRACTICE:
Playing “Finger-picked Patterns,” with jazzy chord types of “Major and Minor” 7th chords will involve learning two primary ideas.

The first is to learn how to accurately apply plucking technique with the pick-hand’s; thumb, index, middle, ring, and sometimes the small finger.

Developing the right-hand (plucking hand), skill will take both time and dedication to learn how to properly control. This means that the path to getting good at this stuff will require the development of a daily practice routine.

Another area of study is the chord shapes that make up the harmony used in playing jazz style chord changes. This level of harmony begins with the use of chord types out of the category of; “Major, Minor and Dominant” seventh.

Down the road, you’ll also want to study the various chord extensions and the group known of as altered chords as well.

Plus, keep in mind that these chords are initially best learned off of the; 6th, 5th and the 4th guitar strings in order to maximize their availability all over the neck.

When it comes time to using them in music, you'll definitely want to have a number of chord type options.




ACOUSTIC GUITAR COURSE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my web-site as a free member and start taking a look at my “Acoustic Guitar” Course.

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That course covers a ton of information on improving Acoustic playing skill. It uses 20 lesson plans with very detailed video along with PDF worksheets you can download and print out to start covering dozens and dozens exercises and drills.

The lessons are all well planned and easy to follow – and they work in a very organized way so that in the end, you’ll increase your knowledge of playing acoustic guitar and you’ll be able to start incorporating skills to more easily play acoustic ideas within any kind of musical situation at a very high level, no matter how complex the music might be!

VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The Creative Guitar courses have all been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com


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EAR TRAINING 003: Minor Scale Intervals

February 17, 2019:
EAR TRAINING 003:
EAR TRAINING 003: Minor Scale Intervals

 
 NEW  Musicians learn the importance of being able to internalize rhythm early on. The same must also be done with the ability to accurately listen to and recognize musical, tone and pitch. The EAR TRAINING course offered at Creative Guitar will help guitar players drastically improve their sense of note identification, recognition and recall...


Lesson 003 of Ear Training Lesson three "Ear Training" focuses on exercises that work on developing sound association and tonal recognition for intervals that exist within the Minor Scale.

EAR TRAINING 003 - DISCLAIMER:
If you have no prior experience with basic music theory, basic rhythm, key signatures and how scales work on the guitar, it is strongly advised to first study the Creative Guitar - Introductory Guitar Program, as well as, the Intermediate Guitar Program.

If you are a guitarist who has no background in basic music theory, key signatures, treble-clef staff /note recognition, or foundational rhythmic duration, then it is advised that prior to working on this course, you study the "Introductory" and "Intermediate" guitar player programs prior to working on this course.

Those preliminary courses, (for beginners and Intermediate players), will lay the foundation for understanding how the nuts and bolts of ear training relate musically and how the principles relate to guitar (as well as other instruments).

The
preliminary courses will also help guitar players better comprehend rhythm duration and key signatures.
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(1). Part one, of lesson three Ear Training develops associations for Minor 2nd and 3rd intervals. Popular songs are used to associate the sound of these minor interval distances.

(2). Part two, adds the association of Minor 6th and 7th intervals. Common, well-known musical pieces are once again used as a way to tie together the relationship of these interval distances.

(3). Part three, works on the recognition of the Minor intervals. Diagrams of the guitar neck and the piano keyboard are used to show the layout of the Minor 2nd and Minor 3rd on each instrument. Use the diagrams to match pitch and recognize the associated songs covered in Part One.

(4). Part four, targets Minor interval recognition of the Minor 6th and 7th through the use of associative melody. Diagrams of the fingerboard and piano are once again utilized for demonstrating these Minor intervals upon both piano and guitar.

(5). Audio Track Training Exercises: Use the MP3 audio tracks (contained within the lesson download), to study the sound of mixed Minor; 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th intervals.


The intervals from the table provided on page 5 of your PDF handout are performed upon the guitar and digital piano. Sing and match pitch to each interval as they are performed on the audio tracks.
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Associating Minor 2nd and Minor 3rd Intervals. Learn associated melody ideas for determining minor 2nd and 3rd intervals.


PART TWO:  Associating Minor 6th and Minor 7th Intervals. Learn associated melody ideas for determining minor 6th and 7th intervals.




PART THREE:
Recognizing minor 2nd and 3rd Intervals: Recognize these intervals using the associated melodies (covered in Part One) on both guitar and on piano.


PART FOUR:  Recognizing minor 6th and 7th Intervals: Recognize these intervals using the associated melodies (covered in Part Two) on both guitar and on piano.

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Paid members can download the handout and MP3 audio in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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How to Write Guitar Riffs in Mixolydian

Building riffs from Mixolydian can be done very easily by using a few simple ideas from the "Mixolydian Pentatonic" scale along with some basic Mixolydian music theory. Learn how to take simple concepts from the color tones of Mixolydian and use them to create killer guitar riffs....




When it comes to building riffs with Mixolydian, musicians need to understand what it is that makes Mixolydian different from other scales that they know already.

There are many ways to do this, but the easiest way is to take music theory ideas along with scale shapes (that are well known), and modify them in simple ways so that they work within the constructs of the Mixolydian mode.

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MIXOLYDIAN PENTATONIC:
For most guitar players, the Minor Pentatonic is the first scale that they will learn on guitar. The most popular shape that we tend to commit to memory very early on is this one...


If we go about modifying the location of just one note, we can come up with a pseudo "Mixolydian Pentatonic" scale shape that can get you playing riffs, and even eventually soloing within the sounds offered by the mode of Mixolydian.

Here’s what the shape looks like on the neck built off of a 6th and 5th string root…

6th String Root "Mixolydian Pentatonic"


5th String Root "Mixolydian Pentatonic"



Now that you understand a few easy principles for moving into the sound of Mixolydian, it’s also important that you understand what really sets Mixolydian apart from any other scale.





MIXOLYDIAN "BASIC" THEORY:
Basic Mixolydian music theory can be taught in the easiest way, by simply realizing that all theory principles will relate any new theories back to the basic major scale. The first step is to relate Mixolydian to Major Scale.

"A" Mixolydian Compared to "A" Major:



When "A" Major scale is compared with "A" Mixolydian, we discover that Mixolydian has a lowered 7th and it also retains the major 3rd step.



In the simplest sense, this makes Mixolydian a major scale with a lowered 7th. Off of a Root note of “A” we get a major scale sound that includes a very unique “G” natural tone.




MIXOLYDIAN RIFFS:
Alright, so now you know a couple of easy scale shape layouts, and you also know which notes to pay attention to when you want to create a riff that locks down on the sound of Mixolydian.

So now let’s check out a group of riffs that are within Mixolydian so that you can understand how these concepts can get applied musically…

Mixolydian Riff #1).


Mixolydian Riff #2).



Mixolydian Riff #3).





CONCLUSION:
Mixolydian scale is just one of the modes of the Major Scale (the fifth degree mode). I discuss all of the modes in my popular eBook “Using the Major Scale Modes.”

If you'd like to dig into the topic of modes a little more intensely, please consider a purchase of my Using the Modes eBook.

I also have lesson plans covering modes within the members area of my website. If you’re ready to start learning a lot more about topics like this one, (as well as many others), join my member’s site as a free member and start looking through all my “Guitar Courses” in the member’s area.

Each course offers students upwards of 25 lessons taught in a step-by-step guide – all based upon progressive topics.

If you’re looking for a way to start vastly improving your guitar playing, visit; CreativeGuitarStudio.com

__________________________________________________

Head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The Creative Guitar courses have all been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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The Secret to Smooth Solos (TRIPLET PICKING)

Much of the overall skill for being able to rip out a smooth solo will come down to how well you can control your picking and your pick accents. One of the best rhythms for practicing the skill of "accent control" is to work on the study of the feel for the triplet picking... 




This lesson is going to get you focused on growing your ability for playing triplet picked lines. For a lot of guitar players, the accents that are involved with playing triplets can be tricky. But, with the right studies, things can improve rapidly.

When you break the triplets down to smaller studies that focus more on helping with how to control triplet picking (within smaller drills), you end up with studies that work to both improve your feel and improve your sense of comfort when it comes to playing any type of triplet picked idea.

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Let’s get started by developing a sense of feel for the pick-hand when it performs the action of picking triplets…

Exercise 1). Developing Triplet Picked Feel



Once you have a good overall sense of pick-hand control for performing the triplet as a rhythmic duration, the next step is to work out a repetitive picking run to help you maintain a sense of stamina.

This is important when it comes to playing lines that will use these rhythms. My next exercise is a short single measure triplet drill that you can practice for playing up and down the guitar neck laterally using the triplet feel.


Exercise 2). 3-String Along the Neck Drill



Once you have a solid sense of control for alternate picking, it is great to re-work your picking studies to incorporate some legato ideas as well.

And, (of course), to get that smooth legato effect on guitar, nothing works better than hammer-ons and pull-offs…





Exercise 3). Along the Neck Drill - Legato



When it comes to playing longer scale passages, the triplet feel is excellent for those scale layouts known as “Three-Note Per String” scale patterns.

The final exercise uses a much longer scale run that incorporates triplet picking within a 3-Note Per String scale structure.


Exercise 4). Triplets and 3-Note Per String Scales







CONCLUSION:
When developing your own scale runs and exercises that apply triplet picking, be sure to consider how the different sections of scale patterns you organize, will be able to balance with your alternate picking pattern used across the triplet feel.

Remember, triplet feel uses mixed down-strokes and up-strokes that get balanced differently, to create different accents.

Be sure to really concentrate and get your triplets clear. After some well-appointed practice time, nothing about triplet picking will feel at all awkward when you build up your speed.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my web-site as a free member and get started by taking a look at my “Guitar Technique” Course.

That course covers a ton of information on improving technical skill. It uses 20 lesson plans with detailed video and PDF worksheets you can download and print out to start covering nearly 100 Guitar technique exercises and drills.

The lessons are all well planned and easy to follow – and they work in a very organized way so that in the end, you’ll increase your knowledge of technique and you’ll start incorporating new skills to more easily play guitar within any kind of musical situation at a very high level, no matter how complex the music that your playing - might be!

__________________________________________________

Head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses have been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com


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