Play This EVERY DAY for a Month! (Miracle Cure | Chords & Rhythm)


If you need to improve your rhythm skills and you integrate this lesson's practice exercise for only one month, you will find that some really incredible changes will start to happen to your rhythm guitar ability along with your chord technique... 

 

 

 

 

The focus of this lesson is based upon rhythm development along with gaining a better grasp of the basic use of chord skills and their integrated involvement. If these areas are weak for you, then you are definitely going to want to watch this video. 

 

In it, I’m going to show you an expanding syncopated rhythm exercise that you can study slowly and you can do every single day. The exercise can be learned so that it can gradually help you reach new (more complex) skill levels. Yet it can be done at you own rate of progress. 

 

WATCH THE VIDEO:

 



 

Do you need to learn how to master chords and rhythm guitar? If you said "No," think again because this is the one area for guitar players that can make or break the development of having solid rhythm and groove skills. 

 

Here's why, rhythm is an area of playing music that most practicing guitar players never reach their full potential in. This means developing your rhythm and chords up to a very high level of skill can be one of the most valuable things that a musician will ever do. 

 

In this lesson I’m going to cover how you can take a 3-measure rhythmic idea and practice this idea for just one month. Once you develop this rhythm you’ll be able to expand upon it (in several ways), and that will allow you to take it even further in your playing. 

 

So, grab your guitar and let's get started by starting with how to get into learning more about rhythm exercise warm-ups right now. 

 

 

 

 

Example 1). Rhythm Warm-Ups

If rhythms are relatively new for you, you’ll need to begin with a warm-up exercise consisting of following along to a metronome or a drum matching and performing; quarter-notes, eighth-notes, and sixteenth-notes in time - with the beat.

 

Quarter-Notes:


 

Eighth-Notes:


 

Sixteenth-Notes:




Now that you’re warmed up, take a look at the lesson rhythm (shown below), it’s going to be our first exercise. This feel is a syncopated groove, so it will feel off-beat.

 


 

Playing in-time (like we did with the warm-ups), is important, but being able to play off the beat, (or what is called “syncopated time”), is how you’ll get great at rhythm.

 

Coming up, I’ve got a couple of examples that demonstrate how to start integrating chords into this rhythm exercise, but first I want to tell you about a special promotional offer that’s related to my, “Handouts Collection eBook.” 

 

                     ____________________________________________________
 

I wanted to take a minute to let you know, that if you want to learn even more about scales and theory I have a great offer for you.

With any donation over $5, or any merchandise purchase from my Tee-Spring store, I’ll send you free copies of THREE of my most popular digital handouts.

One is called, “Harmonized Arpeggio Drills” (it’ll train you on developing your diatonic arpeggios).

Another one is my “Barre Chord” Handout which includes a page showing all the key signatures along with a chord progression that applies barre chords.

Plus, you’ll get my Notation Pack! It has 8 pages of important guitar worksheets for notating anything related to; music charts, guitar chord diagrams, and TAB.

As a BONUS, (from my "Over 40 and Still Can't Play a Scale" video), I'll also throw in a breakdown of all of the chords that are diatonic to the "F Major" scale.

As an EXTRA BONUS for my Phrygian Dominant video, I'll also throw in a breakdown featuring all of the chords that are diatonic to the Phrygian Dominant scale.

Just send me an email off of the contact page of CreativeGuitarStudio.com to let me know about either your donation or your Merchandise purchase and I’ll email you those digital handouts within 24 hrs.   

                       ____________________________________________________

 

 

WHAT IS SYNCOPATION?
The syncopated rhythm of this exercise is not exactly easy to play for most people because it seldom pushes the regular flow of time. 

 

Instead, this example’s “rhythmic stress” ends up accenting places across the beat where we would typically not have the accents of time occur normally. This is the essence of syncopation.

 

Another thing that happens is we have a measure of 2/4 time right in the middle of this groove. This means that our stress on the next measure (when we return to 4/4 time), needs to have a greater accent upon the down beat. 

 

When you put all of these things together, you have a practice groove that makes for an excellent practice exercise, and once this groove is mastered (which could take either a few hours for some players, or possibly a few weeks for others). 

 

Once the groove is mastered it can offer a lot of benefits for not only when we see new rhythms like this, but it can also make those simple grooves (we commonly use in songs) start to feel a lot smoother and a lot easier to perform.

 

So, next, I want to start expanding upon this exercise by introducing a few chord options… 

 

 

 

 

Example 2). 

Applying intervals to the rhythm for harmony I often like starting my students off with the use of power chords and simple 2-note intervals to help get them used to performing some harmony over these complex rhythms. 

 

Now, the intervals I’ve organized for this example are; B, F#, G and E power-chords. As well as, a 2-note “C# and E,” passing interval, into a “D Major” dyad, and finally into a slightly larger open chord of, “G Major.” 



Example 3). 

Applying larger chords to the rhythm As a student’s rhythm improves, I like to move their playing into more involved chord types. These typically include the triad family of chords. 

 

In the final example that I have for you, we’re going to play over the rhythm exercise with a group of triads. If you want to improve your rhythm and your chord skills spend some time learning these types of syncopated riffs... 

 


 

They work the best when they’re only around 2 or 3 measures long. And, you’ll want to keep in mind that these crazy off-time rhythm grooves will definitely produce some really amazing results - because they provide you with a chance to understand the off-beat much better... 

 

Which has a counter effect of developing your feel (for all types of timing that you’ll encounter in different pieces of music), at a much higher level of playing. So, if you invest as little as a month into this type of work, it will pay off huge. 

 

I’ve practiced on a lot of these grooves myself and they work wonders. I’ve also taught them to a lot of my students (for many years now), and I can tell you that they are great for every level of guitar player. 

 

Also, I should let you know that if you enjoy this type of practice, there’s a course in the Members Area of CreativeGuitarStudio.com that’s called “Rhythm Guitar,” and it’s dedicated to specifically this type of work. 


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Want to Master the Guitar? Give Up These 4 Things!

Do you have a goal of mastering your guitar? If you said yes, then you're not alone! The trouble is that only a few guitar players are aware of how to master playing the guitar...

 

Everyone is looking for that "quick-fix," or some easy way to get good at guitar fast, but we all know there is no quick easy way to master guitar.

 

 

 

 

However, to help you along in this quest I’m going to talk about 4 things that you need to give up if you ever hope to understand how to truly master the guitar. 

 

I’m going to discuss the best way to create powerful changes in your practice routine, how to stay on track with developing your core abilities, and how to launch your 2 year mastery mindset.

 

WATCH THE VIDEO:

 




When you give up the four things that I discuss in this presentation you will start to feel better about your playing almost instantly and you'll learn powerful ways of working towards all of your playing goals.

 

In this post we are talking all about ways to use that will lead you closer to mastering your guitar today. There’s four points that I’ve labeled as "four things I’d like you to consider that you’d give up in order to create a better approach to learning." 

 

And, if you want to become the best guitar player that you can be, it’s important to start into that direction with the suggestions that I have for you here in this video. So, let’s get started with number one.

 

 

 

 

1). STOP PLAYING THE SAME STUFF:
The first one is; “Give Up Playing the Same Stuff Every Practice Session.” Practice time is meant to help get you to develop your skills and that means you’ll want a plan that changes, (if you’ve followed my videos you’ve heard me say that every three weeks your practice schedule needs to change). 

 

If there’s one practice approach I’ve seen fail (and it’s an approach I know that will cause months and possibly even years of stagnation), it is to approach every practice day in the same way. You need change to occur and those changes need to happen at around 3-week intervals.

 

When we discuss change that relates to a practice routine, it normally involves changes made to what it is that you have established across some form of a practice period. 

 

If you don’t use a practice chart or some type of topic list to follow when you sit down to study guitar, how do you expect to cover the things that will offer you best path to improvement? 

 

A practice chart allows you to focus on what it is specifically that you’re going to study. The work is identified and can be given laser sharp focus so that you reach a level of success.

 

It’s a great way to make rapid progress so you definitely need to start doing it today. Making a list of what you want to practice, and sticking to that list for approximately a three week period will do incredible things for your playing. 

 

So, remember Give Up, “on Every Practice Session being the Same,” and start following a plan that’s focused on practicing topics that will help you improve you skills across a three week span of time. And, then change that plan and add new topics as the weeks go on.

 

 

 

 

2). TOO MUCH TIME ON SONG LEARNING:
The next thing to Give Up doing is, “Endless Days of Practicing Other Peoples Songs.” I know that it’s fun to play songs that you enjoy and hey let’s face it we absolutely do get something out of learning and playing other people music. 

 

However, you need to limit that work when you’re still developing your skills, and never allow that type of practice to consume you. 

 

Over the years, I have met so many students that focused almost entirely on only learning songs and restricting their playing and their practice to that of only being focused upon other people’s music.

 

This means that (as practicing guitar students), they were ignoring their technical work on areas like; music theory, the development of scales, arpeggios, chord harmony and rhythm development. 

 

I hope that you really take this one to heart, because if you ignore those critical areas of playing and only focus on song learning, your skill development will stagnate and you won’t develop all of your core musical skills.

 

Coming up I’ve got two more ideas I want to cover with you, but first I want to tell you about a special promotional offer related to my Handouts Collection eBook. 

 

                     ____________________________________________________
 

I wanted to take a minute to let you know, that if you want to learn even more about scales and theory I have a great offer for you.

With any donation over $5, or any merchandise purchase from my Tee-Spring store, I’ll send you free copies of THREE of my most popular digital handouts.

One is called, “Harmonized Arpeggio Drills” (it’ll train you on developing your diatonic arpeggios).

Another one is my “Barre Chord” Handout which includes a page showing all the key signatures along with a chord progression that applies barre chords.

Plus, you’ll get my Notation Pack! It has 8 pages of important guitar worksheets for notating anything related to; music charts, guitar chord diagrams, and TAB.

As a BONUS, (from my "Over 40 and Still Can't Play a Scale" video), I'll also throw in a breakdown of all of the chords that are diatonic to the "F Major" scale.

As an EXTRA BONUS for my Phrygian Dominant video, I'll also throw in a breakdown featuring all of the chords that are diatonic to the Phrygian Dominant scale.

Just send me an email off of the contact page of CreativeGuitarStudio.com to let me know about either your donation or your Merchandise purchase and I’ll email you those digital handouts within 24 hrs.   

                       ____________________________________________________

 

 

3). APPLY 2 - 3 YRS. OF INTENSIVE STUDY:
Before I get into the next thing, (to give up for your quest toward guitar mastery), I need to clarify that every great guitar player generally applies themselves for approximately 2 to 3 years of intensive practice and in-depth study. 

 

In that period guitarists will tend to focus on, learning music theory, rhythm and harmony, chord development, technique all of the core musical material. 

 

Oftentimes this is the period that a student of music will move away, leave friends and family behind and dive head-first into guitar – locked away for hours at a time every day of the week.

 

What this really gets into is sacrificing; hobbies, habits and friends for your passion of developing the intense study (the in-depth study) of the art behind mastering your instrument and creating music. 

 

It can be difficult to walk away from going to parties, having fun with friends and leaving behind your hobbies to devote yourself (100 percent) toward learning to become the best that you can be on your instrument. 

 

It doesn’t matter who you are, this period away and this period of "locked away" time you spend (dedicated to the guitar), will be what will ultimately separate you from hundreds of others who want to be musicians, but who will never end up making it.

 

 

 

 

4). NO MORE KNUCKLE-HEADS:
The final thing I would highly suggest that you give up is all the knuckleheads around you who hold you back from achieving what you were meant to achieve on this instrument. 

 

There’s far too much potential in music, (once you begin down the path of learning to play guitar), to be held back by knuckleheads who just want to drink beer and smoke dope, or sit around playing video games instead of you finding people who want the same musical results as you do.

 

Find people to create music with. Because if you want to create music, if you want to become incredible at playing guitar than surround yourself with other people who are also like that. 

 

Because the knuckleheads who are not a part of the musical world, (and especially those who only want to use you as another human being to drink alcohol, or smoke dope with), those people will never lead you closer nor will they push you further toward your abilities to become the best guitar player and musician that you can be. 

 

So, ditch the knuckleheads and find people who share the same musical goals as you do. That’ll go a long way toward helping you reach the level of playing that you are striving for.

 


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Do This LATE at Night to Play Your BEST Solos!

If you suffer from guitar soloing problems, or if you have problems based around any type of creativity issue when it comes to playing guitar solos, or even if you suffer from songwriting "composers block," then you are definitely going to want to check out this lesson...

 

 

 

 

In this class, I’m going to show you a guitar soloing exercise that, if you do it late in the evening, will have you soloing more creatively and with more dynamic ideas than you ever had before. 

 

WATCH THE VIDEO:

 




LATE NIGHT PRACTICE:
Late evening practice is proven to work wonders with artistic creativity, and all you need to do is try the exercise that I provide in this lesson for a few weeks late into the night for proof that this works. 

 

The exercise won’t take you long to do and it will help you get your solos and your creativity up to new levels.

 

In this lesson we'll try and focus on the problems associated with the playing and practicing of solos and, in general - creativity. 

 

But, the crazy thing is that these are problems that you really shouldn’t be having. Yet, many musicians will.

 

Let’s start with a quick look at a comment from Noah in my Video "Blues Rock Pattern You Should Do EVERY Morning," (about the benefits of practicing early in the morning). 


And, in particular where a viewer (named Noah) wrote, “My other best practice time is late, an hour or two before bedtime. Lot’s of creativity in those times.” 

 


 

So, if you are not doing this, "Late Night Practice," then start doing it.And, to help you along, I've got a fantastic practice approach for you to try.

 

Late night practice is something to really pay attention to. And, if you approach this in the right way you can have amazing benefits from late night practice time, especially when it comes to creativity... 

 

Let’s get started. Grab your guitar and I’ll show you an easy but really great way to quickly get some creative practice time in - late at night.

 

 

 

 

CHORD DEVELOPMENT:
The first thing that I need to stress (before you play and practice soloing), is having a short time that you spend, when you first sit down that’s dedicated on composing chord progressions. 

 

One of the easiest and best chord jams that you can focus on is the I-IV-V progression. Let’s try-out a rare approach to the classic I-IV-V that involves an idea called voice leading.

 

Example 1).
The progression (that you see below), is in “B Major.” But, the harmony in the 4th measure is applying a unique descending bass line. Spend some time studying how the chords function.

 


 

Coming up, I’ve got a great scale idea for you to learn and use with this chord progression, but first I want to tell you about a special promotional offer that’s related to my Handouts Collection eBook. 

 

                      ____________________________________________________
 

I wanted to take a minute to let you know, that if you want to learn even more about scales and theory I have a great offer for you.

With any donation over $5, or any merchandise purchase from my Tee-Spring store, I’ll send you free copies of THREE of my most popular digital handouts.

One is called, “Harmonized Arpeggio Drills” (it’ll train you on developing your diatonic arpeggios).

Another one is my “Barre Chord” Handout which includes a page showing all the key signatures along with a chord progression that applies barre chords.

Plus, you’ll get my Notation Pack! It has 8 pages of important guitar worksheets for notating anything related to; music charts, guitar chord diagrams, and TAB.

As a BONUS, (from my "Over 40 and Still Can't Play a Scale" video), I'll also throw in a breakdown of all of the chords that are diatonic to the "F Major" scale.

As an EXTRA BONUS for my Phrygian Dominant video, I'll also throw in a breakdown featuring all of the chords that are diatonic to the Phrygian Dominant scale.

Just send me an email off of the contact page of CreativeGuitarStudio.com to let me know about either your donation or your Merchandise purchase and I’ll email you those digital handouts within 24 hrs.   

                       ____________________________________________________



SCALES DEVELOPMENT:
Once you have an interesting group of chord changes organized and you’re ready for some creative work, the next step is to move into a small section of the associated scale, (this would best be a scale that’s built within the same key signature). 

 

This is important so that you can begin getting right into some creative soloing work as quickly as possible. 

 

Here’s an example of how you can approach your scale ideas on your fingerboard - before you solo…

 

Example 2).
Scale Layouts for Fast Soloing and Creativity!

I like organizing the scales that I’m going to use for soloing in two regions along the guitar fingerboard. The first of these is generally off of a two string lateral approach that uses the notes of the Pentatonic. 

 

Here’s the pattern for the key of our progression. It’s a, “B Major” Pentatonic off of a 5th string - second fret root note. 

 

 5th String Root:


I also like extending into an upper group of notes for more range. In this case we’ll go off 3rd string, and when doing that I also like to experiment with including a scale tone or two, in this case a 4th. (E). 

 

3rd String Root:


 

 

LATE NIGHT /EVENING CREATIVITY:

I am going to bet that if you try spending some serious time on; soloing, along with writing chord progressions, even recording, or songwriting later in the evening - you are going to find that the late evening is one of the best times for creative work. 

 

You’ll probably discover that you’ll get really cool ideas and unique sounding phrases in the later hours of the night.

 

I’m not sure why this is exactly. There have been some studies that say the human body is more alert to sounds, smells, and sensations during the darker hours of the night time. 

 

There has also been research saying that creativity hits a high plateau at night because of the darkness of night-time and its association with the unknown, (which can cause our imagination to run wild).

 

Whatever it is, if you haven’t tried it yet - then be sure to apply the chord progression and scale concept I talked about in this lesson and give it a go. Ninety percent of songwriters and musicians swear by the later evening hours for peak creativity and I know it definitely works for me as well.



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