Is Pentatonic Scale Killing YOUR Solos?

The Pentatonic Scale is one of the most popular scales in the world of guitar soloing. Every day, hundreds of thousands of Pentatonic Licks are performed by guitar players everywhere. This lesson demonstrates an easy way to inject some life into this popular scale pattern...




Far too many guitar players will repeat the exact same Pentatonic licks over and over again for years to come in exactly the same ways, which can get stale sounding.

In this lesson, I’m going to show you a simple "One Drop" note concept for the Pentatonic that can work as a way to quickly and easily stretch your performance of solos using this popular scale.

During the lesson, I'll explain in detail just how easy it is to add in a couple of new note extensions into the pattern so that you can stretch your scales and stretch your musicianship for better soloing results.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



THE MINOR PENTATONIC SCALE:
Minor Pentatonic is the scale type which is the most widely known and the most widely used scale by guitar players. 

In fact, the Pentatonic Minor is the shape that gets played almost 100% of the time when I’ll ask a new student who comes into my office to just go through and play any scale that they know.

The Minor Pentatonic scale pattern is a scale shape that’s generally learned by students very early on. And, if no other scale patterns are introduced to the student, this one gets played for much too long becoming the main scale for literally all their licks and runs.

Guitar students will actually use this scale so much that they will wind up getting held back from learning new sounds and learning new ways of playing licks and runs – which is obviously not very good.




EXTENDING THE PENATONIC:
Now, you guys all know I don’t hate Pentatonic scale or anything, it’s a fantastic scale and it’s a great sound to be able to start building soloing skills from - very quickly.

But, what I am saying here in this lesson is that you don’t want to hang around on Pentatonic scale for too long, because it does have its limitations.

What we’re going to do is introduce an easy idea to help you branch out from the sound of the Pentatonic by using a “One Fret Drop” idea (from the tones that exist in it).

These "Drop Notes" will help to create a new direction of sound from this popular scale so you can start adding in new tonal effects to a very common group of notes that you already know.


THE "ONE-DROP" METHOD:
In getting started, let’s learn a favorite 6th-string guitar neck pattern of mine for the Minor Pentatonic and we’ll use it to study how this concept that I’m referring to as the “One Drop,” method really works.

Here’s how this pattern operates from off of the 6th string root from the note of “A” at the guitar’s 5th-fret…

Standard Minor Pentatonic:
6th-String (A)




"One-Drop" Minor Pentatonic:
6th-String (Moveable)




So, as you can tell these "One Drop" scale adjustments move down from the Pentatonic’s Minor 7th scale degree, to include a “Major 6th.” And beyond the octave the, Pentatonic scales Minor 3rd degree also drops down to include a, “Major 9th.”



The best part about all of this is that these two sounds can be used either in isolation, or they can be blended together to create some really interesting soloing “options.”

___________________________________________________

NOTE: Isn't this just the Dorian Mode?
The total accumulation of all notes involved does indeed come together as the "Dorian" mode.

However, the premise of this "One-Drop" approach is based more upon "Dropping" existing tones from the Minor Pentatonic, and having the drop tones available as "Optional" notes.

Also, I've stressed in this lesson, that we're focusing on the use of the 2nd degree tone applied only as an upper "Extension" used exclusively beyond the octave.


___________________________________________________





Next, I want to show you another pattern for this same idea, but this time we’ll be basing our scale pattern off of the 5th string root.

“One-Drop” Minor Pentatonic:
5th-String (Moveable)




The "One-Drop" shift occurs on the 3rd and 2nd strings when this concept is applied off of the guitar's 5th string root. Study adding and blending this sound over different Minor key and Blues riff situations.



As you could tell the 5th-string root scale pattern for this “One-Drop” approach (with the Minor Pentatonic) applies a shift at the 2nd string to compensate for the guitars unique tuning arrangement there.

Other than that, we’re still dealing with the same intervals related to this sound.




WHY DO THIS?
It’s at this point where I really need to stress that this type of work is what will stretch you out of your comfort zone with this scale and get you to force yourself to hear and apply new sounds.

The "One-Drop" Minor Pentatonic method is all about shifting your mind-set from doing a scale pattern (the same way), for too long using the same notes.

Instead the new "One-Drop" scale degrees become a study of new "optional" tones and new sounds for your ear. As well as, how you can get both your ear and your fingers to lead you to become a better guitar player.

It goes without saying that playing a decent guitar solo is not about being able to play a scale perfect, or fast, but rather it's about getting you and your listeners exposed to new sounds.

Most importantly, it is about learning how to control new sounds. So, if you want a way to stretch the effect of a scale (a scale that is super popular), then Minor Pentatonic obviously fits that category.

I’m guessing that many of you watching this already know that this scales sound – but the idea of this video and blog post is all about making modifications with notes that you already understand.

When you start doing this type of work, you will begin exercising a scale so that it offers you more tonal response, but most importantly, the work will start to alter the note path of what you’re hearing in your head.

That is what will really make you a better guitar player.

If you found this video helpful, make sure you leave your comments and thumbs on the YouTube video, and if you’re looking for a step by step guitar program that puts real – tested methods into a proven guitar course (not just random YouTube videos) it’s all available over at Creative Guitar Studio.com.

And, remember you don’t want to miss any of my guitar lesson videos–- so turn on those notifications and subscribe to the channel. All right guys we’ll be back here again real soon. Thanks for checking out the lesson till the very end - bye for now.




VISIT THE WEBSITE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my, “Guitar Courses.”

 I’ve spent over 25 years working with hundreds of guitar students creating thousands of detailed step-by-step guitar lessons for both my website members and my private students.

The result is the most comprehensive guitar course that covers every aspect of beginner to advanced playing ideas to help you improve your playing.

LIMITED TIME OFFER: 
If you join my site as a Premium member, you’ll receive a FREE copy of my popular Guitar Technique eBook.

My Guitar Technique eBook is 28 pages of jam-packed exercises, drills and studies for mastering all of your technical skills at playing Guitar.

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

Can't Understand Your Neck? Just Start with This!

Are you feeling stumped at how to start learning your neck and you don’t seem to have a plan to get started... then you need this lesson! In it, I’m going to show you the first step in how to start learning your neck by establishing control over the unisons that link positions between the exact same tone... 




If you don't understand this "5-fret Unison" concept, then this lack of knowledge is preventing you from knowing the locations of all individual tones across the entire fretboard. 

Once you learn this process it will be the first step to making it possible to understand the note locations and then later, play chords and melody all over the entire range of the guitar.

If you’ve tried to study the guitar neck and you've tried to learn how notes move around, how chords sit on the neck and how scales are laid out on the neck, you probably have already noticed something. The guitar neck is only 5 frets long when judging pitch to pitch off of the same tone.

If you haven’t studied this, you need to do some work it. This principle is the key to completely organizing how the notes are located on guitar and how chords can be mapped out, as well as, how scales are established (so that you can learn how to do solos and play better rhythm guitar).

In this YouTube video (below), I’m going to start breaking all of this down for you, and as time goes on, I’ll be making more videos about learning the neck. 

So to make sure you don’t miss anything, obviously you have to subscribe but do me a favor and also turn on that notification bell so that you don’t miss any of the upcoming lessons on learning your neck.

WATCH THE VIDEO:




MAPPING USISONS:
We will begin by taking the note of “C” at the 5th string’s 3rd fret. Next, we'll go up along that 5th-string moving five frets higher. Then, jump over to the 6th string’s 8th fret.


What we have with that note relationship from third to eighth fret, is our 5-fret distance where we’ve located another tone of the exact same “C” pitch.

Now keep in mind, that’s the exact same pitch of "C" that we had previously played over at the 5th guitar string's, 3rd fret.




MAPPING A UNISON MAJOR SCALE:
Next, I want you to follow along with me as we connect those notes using a short, simplistic “C Major” scale pattern.

IMPORTANT:
Keep in mind that this is not a typical play through of a "C" Major scale performed from a "Tonic" note up to an "Octave." This layout is considered as a, "Unison" scale layout.


‘C’ Major - Unison Scale Pattern



Next, we'll create a "C" Major Unison Scale phrase.

‘C’ Major - Unison Scale Phrase:








MAPPING A UNISON MINOR SCALE:
Next, let’s change up some of the notes that are located between this 5-fret layout so that we can play through a “C” Minor scale phrase while still keeping the new Minor scale layout located in between those exact same “C” tone frets, on the 5th and 6th strings.

‘C’ Minor - Unison Scale Pattern:



Next, we'll create a "C" Minor Unison Scale phrase.

‘C’ Minor - Unison Scale Phrase:



PITCH TO PITCH (UNISON) PRACTICE:
At this point you’ve learned about connecting the neck between two of the same pitches (a Unison), across two strings using the two most popular scales in music.

Now, go back to a scenario where someone might have told you that you need to study 5 or 7 scale patterns for every scale across the entire guitar neck every day in order to learn the guitar scales across the fret-board.

What good is all of that in the early days of learning the neck, if you don’t even grasp the basic idea of how the guitar neck is only 5-frets pitch to pitch.

Obviously, down the road you can do all the long sessions that you want to practicing all of scales across every inch of the fingerboard in 5 or 7 different patterns.




If you don’t start with a good connection across this simple 5-fret region – do you really think that you’re going to have a solid grasp for those more involved full sized 7 tone scales across multiple positions? Probably not. It will most likely confuse you.


The next series of connecting exercises that we’re going to do, will take the “C” Major scale fragment from between those Unison tones and move it up the guitar neck from the 5th to 10th and then from the 8th to the 13th.

The next examples will show you how to transition that “C” Major scale along into new octave regions and in doing so, help you stretch your knowledge out across the guitar neck while evolving the study of this 5 fret /pitch to pitch principle.


SHIFTING OCTAVE RANGE:
Next, we'll take our "C Major" Unison scale up the neck into a group of higher octaves. This will help you better understand how easy this shape is to move around the fret-board.


‘C’ Major - 5th and 4th-string 
  • Unison Scale Pattern



‘C’ Major - 5th and 4th-string 
  • Unison Scale Phrase



‘C’ Major - 4th and 3rd-string 
  • Unison Scale Pattern




‘C’ Major - 4th and 3rd-string 
  • Unison Scale Phrase




‘C’ Major - 2nd and 1st-string 
  • Unison Scale Pattern



‘C’ Major - 2nd and 1st-string 
  • Unison Scale Phrase


CONCLUSION:
Learning the notes, the scales, and all of your chords on the guitar can certainly start to feel like a pretty overwhelming task when you first get yourself going into a serious practice routine of learning your entire neck. the long and short of it is that it's going to take some time.

There is a lot to study when it comes down to learning the guitar fingerboard. But, if you learn the guitar neck in sections and you learn where and how simple patterns exist, and combine that with an understanding for how a few basic connection techniques can help get you started - the layout of the neck will slowly become a whole lot easier for you to understand.





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Guys if you found this video /lesson helpful make sure you leave your comments and thumbs up below. 

And, if you’re looking for a step by step guitar program that puts real tested methods into a proven guitar course (not just random YouTube videos), it’s all available over at Creative Guitar Studio.com.

And, remember you don’t want to miss any of these guitar neck lesson videos in this series  (because I want to start covering how to really learn the neck using simple note segmenting concepts), turn on those notifications and subscribe to the YouTube channel.

All right guys we’ll be back here again real soon. Thanks for learning!

VISIT THE WEBSITE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my, “Guitar Courses.”

I’ve spent over 25 years working with hundreds of guitar students creating thousands of detailed step-by-step guitar lessons for both my website members and my private students.

The result is the most comprehensive guitar course that covers every aspect of beginner to advanced playing ideas to help you improve your playing.


LIMITED TIME OFFER:
If you join my site as a Premium member, you’ll receive a FREE copy of my popular Guitar Technique eBook.

My Guitar Technique eBook is 28 pages of jam-packed exercises, drills and studies for mastering all of your technical skills at playing Guitar.

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

5 Things EVERY Amazing Guitarist Does

Getting to a level of being "amazing" at playing the guitar is not as complicated as some people might make it out to be. In fact, it can be boiled down to just five things. In this post I’m going to show you the 5 things that every amazing guitar player does that you can start copying in order to get amazing yourself and stay that way forever...




Today we’re going to get you organized with a collection of ideas that will help you work on learning how to better understand the ways that the guitar relates to musical concepts like; rhythm, intervals, chords, scales and keys for both performing and creating music.

These areas of practice are the foundation for getting good at performing and understanding music. But, the majority of guitar players never think about them as a series of topics for practice, and that’s what we’re going to do in this video.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



The five workout ideas I’m going to show you will help you better understand how every amazing guitar player has made it to be able to develop their high level skills and ability, and all you’ll have to do is copy these things down - and integrate them yourself.

Luckily I’ve already witnessed these principles in action. I’ve had the experience of working with some of the best players in the world at the Musicians Institute in Hollywood California and I know that these concepts work.

I’m passing these ideas on to you. And, all you need to do is take out a pen and copy these down, and then start applying them.




STEP 1). ORGANIZE YOUR PRACTICE:
Organize your practice into 3 Month Blocks with 22-day cycles of material /month. In between, be sure to take some days off from practice.

In other words, have a routine - and stick to the routine. Make sure the routine is balanced with the learning of songs (from several styles of music – even styles you don’t care for – learn those songs too).

Include technical studies, rhythm studies, music theory, guitar neck theory and most importantly Ear Training.

STEP 2). INCORPORATE SPEED BUILDING:
Every other day do a speed building exercise that involves taking into consideration some element of chord involvement as well as, an element of single note playing.

This can involve switching from one chord pattern to another (as quickly as you can). And also, playing through a section of a; scale, or a segment of notes from a synchronization drill – but again doing it as quickly as you possibly can.

Strive for as much perfection as you can possible produce from your "fast" playing. But the principle is really all about playing fast.

Go through the ideas with as much speed as you possibly can do while still maintaining the most decent sounding performance of the part.Don't play sloppy, but by all means push yourself to the edge of your ability.




STEP 3). STUDY RANDOM NOTE GROUPS:
Every day, take a group of up to 5 notes from a single key signature and place them on the guitar neck in a random position. You’ll want to have this formation of notes be a group that is not any type of common chord layout that you’re familiar with.

It should also not be of any type of scale formation that’s known to you. Instead, this should be a note shape that’s random.

Once you’ve selected the key signature, and the specific tones on the guitar strings, the next step is to analyze it all and learn the intervals that exist from the root of the group of notes that you’ve laid out.

Example:

On the diagrams shown above, I've outlined a random collection of tones from the scale of “C Major.” The specific notes are;"G, B, C, E and F."

Once you’ve analyzed the group of notes, and you understand the intervals, record a simple jam-riff from the root of the key that you’re in and play from the key signature tonic chord (in this case “C Major”), to the keys V-chord. In our case, we’re in the key of “C Major” and that means our V-chord is a “G Major.”

Once you’ve made your recording, play it back, and practice performing some random, "off-the-cuff" melodic ideas using the notes... Watch the video at [08:30] where I play an example of how you could do this.

Working out an analysis of notes on the neck like this, along with understanding the key, understanding the interval distances and also forcing yourself to play chords and make up short simple melodic ideas - will go a long way toward slowly upping your game within the realms of polishing up your ability to improvise on guitar.

Every great guitarist that I’ve ever met has worked on ideas like this and once you start trying this routine, you’ll notice the benefits that come from this type of work and why it’s a popular exercise among amazing guitar players.




STEP 4). SING AND TRANSCRIBE:
Practice both Singing and Learning melodic ideas that are from famous pieces of music. Every amazing guitar player out there has spent an incredible amount of time dedicated to learning songs by musicians that they feel are important to learn on the instrument.

If you’re not spending time listening and transcribing the music of other musicians that inspire you, then it’s definitely time that you started doing this.

Even if you feel like you can’t perfectly nail down the exact chords and the specific melody lines of a song that you like, then at least try and get as close as possible. Basically the more that you practice doing this sort of training, the easier it will eventually become for you.

Hearing a melody line or a group of chords and being able to copy that note for note is a high level skill for any musician. But, even if you find it incredibly frustrating, you still absolutely need to make this a regular part of your practice routine.

STEP 5). STRETCH YOUR PERSONAL LIMITS:
The last area I need to touch on has to do with stretching yourself as a player, and what I mean by this is getting into musical situations that force you out of your comfort zone.

Every great musician will absolutely 100 percent confirm that one of the main things that they did to get them to where they are, is they forced themselves to do things in music and as a guitar player that they thought they couldn’t do.

Once you start getting into musical situations that are just slightly beyond your level of skill, there’s going to be major changes happen for you. So, jam with people that are better than you, ask to sit in with a band and play a song that you’ve been preparing.

Practice music that seems outside of your ability zone. All of this type of work will force you to work harder, and it’ll give you real world examples of what it’s like to be playing and performing at a higher level of expertise.

Stretching yourself is a huge factor in reaching new levels of musical ability and it’s a driving force for your own personal improvement as a practicing musician.

Let’s review these five things one more time so that you’re perfectly clear on what you’re going to need to start working toward in order to begin reaching new levels of playing and new levels of musicianship.




REVIEW:
First, organize your practice schedule into Three Month Blocks with 22-day cycles of material. In between, make sure to take some days off from practice.

Second, every other day do a speed building exercise that involves taking into consideration some element of chord study as well as, an element of single note playing.

Third, every-day, take a group of up to 5 notes from a single key and place them on the guitar in a random position. Analyze their intervals, their names and set-up a jam to create some musical ideas.

Number four, practice "Singing and Learning" (Transcription), melodic ideas that come from famous pieces of music.

Finally, number Five, at least once every 3 months, force yourself to do something in music (and as a guitar player), that you think you can’t do.

If you get into doing these practice principles, you’ll notice a huge shift in your ability - for the better.

I hope that you enjoyed hearing about these 5 practice concepts for developing the skills and attributes of the world’s best guitar players.

If you’d like to learn more about how to further develop your guitar playing - join my web-site as a free member and start taking a look at all of my “Guitar” Courses.

They cover a ton of information on improving general and advanced playing skills. The lessons are all well planned and they’re easy to follow.





VISIT THE WEBSITE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my, “Guitar Courses.”

I’ve spent over 25 years working with hundreds of guitar students creating thousands of detailed step-by-step guitar lessons for both my website members and my private students.

The result is the most comprehensive guitar course that covers every aspect of beginner to advanced playing ideas to help you improve your playing.


LIMITED TIME OFFER:
If you join my site as a Premium member, you’ll receive a FREE copy of my popular Guitar Technique eBook.

My Guitar Technique eBook is 28 pages of jam-packed exercises, drills and studies for mastering all of your technical skills at playing Guitar.

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

The EASY and FAST Way to Learn ANY Song!

You're a beginner guitar player and you need to learn to play a difficult song FAST, (maybe for this weekend at the lake by the campfire, jamming with a new band, or perhaps because your church group asked you to play with the band on Sunday morning). What do you do?




Whatever the playing /performance situation, the first thing you need to do is STOP fumbling over difficult chords that are beyond your skill level. You're not going to learn them quick enough to be able to play the song if your skills are below the level required.

In this post, I’m going to run through the fastest way to be able to play any song by using a better chording alternative, it's called power-chording.

As a matter of fact, the power-chord alternative we are going to use is one of the easiest ways to play a song on guitar!

In the video and post below, I'll show you a trick for how to apply power-chording and I'll show you a real song exercise to demonstrate exactly how to get the job done most effectively using power chords.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



JAMMING SONGS THAT ARE TOO DIFFICULT:
In this post we’re going to talk about a situation that happens to a lot of my students. And, it’s something that can really cause a lot of stress. It has to do with “getting together,” and playing with others.

Whether the "tough situation" involves jamming new songs by the camp-fire, or performing a tough new piece with your church band, or maybe it's just jamming on a difficult song with a friend on a Saturday afternoon. Whatever it may be - what do you do if the chords are just too difficult.

I’m sure by now - many of you already know - it can take quite a while to be able to learn your basic chords on guitar. And, even though (as I’ve said in past videos), you can play almost 75% of the songs ever written with the basic open chords and a capo… still there’s quite a bit of practice involved with learning them (to a level where you can apply them in a song).

So, in this lesson I’m going to introduce a method that you can use to instantly play through any song with your friends at the beach, at church, at your next campfire – you name it! Best of all, this system works great and even better is it’s really easy to learn.




HOW TO DO THIS:
Alright, so doing this will involve two steps. The first step is that you’ll need to become aware of the notes on the guitars 6th and 5th strings, (up to at least the 7th fret of the fingerboard).

Since most guitar students start out by learning the notes in the open position, it’s the notes up the neck that can cause problems... But, you can learn note names up the neck rather quickly by memorizing the notes found at each marker-dot location.

From the 6th string at:
3rd fret, 5th and 7th, we get G, A, and B.




Then, on the 5th string from the: 
3rd fret, to 5th and then 7th we get C, D and E.




You can memorize these note names from the 6th string:
ascend with the sentence; “Go, Ask, Buddy.”





From the 5th string at 7th fret, move in the opposite direction:
Use the sentence, “Email, Don’t, Call.”




To learn those marker dot notes memorize the sentence:


“Go, Ask, Buddy,” “Email, Don’t, Call.”


After you become aware of the note names on the 5th and 6th string marker dots, you’ll need to understand that in-between those frets are the locations of sharp and flat notes.

Just keep in mind that all of the notes on the guitar have whole steps between them, except for “B to C” and, “E to F.” Those notes only have one fret between them.





THE "POWER-CHORD" SOLUTION:
The second step is to start practicing one of the easiest shapes played on the guitar. Now, you’re going to need to get really good at this shape because it’s the secret to playing any song in record time. It’s called the “Power-Chord.”


What’s great about the power-chord shape is it can function with as little as two notes. So, all you need to do in order to establish the fretting pattern of the power-chord is use just two fingers.

The lower pitch note is the Root of the chord and the higher pitch note is in harmony with the lower root. Power-chords are neither Major nor Minor, and they can be used as a way to cover any major or minor chord used in any song.

So, let’s run through an example of how you can play a chord progression in the key of, “A Major,” using nothing but power-chords.





APPLICATION EXAMPLE:
For our example, we're going to examine a play through of a key of, “A Major” progression.

The chord changes are; “A Major,” “D Major,” “F# Minor 7th,” and “E Dominant 7th.”



Although common, those chords could be tough shapes for a beginner guitarist… And, to be able to play those full chord shapes, you’d need to know both Open Position and Barre chords. And, that could be almost impossible for a beginner guitarist or intermediate player.

But, with "Power Chording," you could cover all of those chords nicely with just one easy 2-note power-chord shape. 

Here’s how that same chord progression would sound, but this time played with power-chords.




POWER-CHORD BREAK DOWN:









As you can tell, playing a chord progression using power-chords does not offer the full rich effects of the complete major and minor chord types. 

But, over time, (and with practice), you’ll eventually be able to develop all of those more challenging; major, minor and seventh chords in your open position, as well as, all across the guitar neck.

On my web-site, I have a free lesson on learning all of the basic open chords on guitar. And, it comes with an excellent handout with all of the open chords that you’ll need to know.

Have a look over that lesson if you need more practice on your basic chords.

The Basic Chords on Guitar:




Also, in my web-sites Members Area, the “Introductory and the Intermediate Guitar Programs” offer students a chance to really start learning everything about playing and using all of the important open chords, as well as, all the barre chords across the entire guitar neck.

If you’d like to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher - visit my website and start looking through my Guitar courses. There are dozens of lesson plans all with very detailed videos along with PDF worksheets that you can download and print out to start learning more about the guitar.

The lessons are all well planned they’re easy to follow – and they all work in a very organized way so that in the end, you’ll increase your knowledge of guitar, and you’ll be able to start incorporating higher end guitar skills for the music that you enjoy.





VISIT THE WEBSITE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my, “Guitar Courses.”

I’ve spent over 25 years working with hundreds of guitar students creating thousands of detailed step-by-step guitar lessons for both my website members and my private students.

The result is the most comprehensive guitar course that covers every aspect of beginner to advanced playing ideas to help you improve your playing.


LIMITED TIME OFFER:
If you join my site as a Premium member, you’ll receive a FREE copy of my popular Guitar Technique eBook.

My Guitar Technique eBook is 28 pages of jam-packed exercises, drills and studies for mastering all of your technical skills at playing Guitar.

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes