7 Stunning Diminished Tips for Powerful Songs

This lesson discusses one of the most useful chord types when it comes to substitution principles - the Diminished chord. If you've ever wondered how to effectively use this exotic /jazzy sound you're in luck. This lesson covers seven of the most popular ways that Diminished chords are applied in songs...




There are three main types of Diminished; the triad, the half-Diminished - also referred to as the Minor 7 (b5) - as well as, the Fully Diminished, which is also often called the “Dim. 7th.”

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In this lesson our main focus will be based upon using the Half Diminished (also known as the "Minor 7 (b5)" chord), along with the Fully Diminished (also often called the "Dim.7" chord), as a way to connect other chords within a piece.

In this lesson we’ll do this with the Diminished chords being introduced introduced 'in between' some common chord movements within seven different chord progressions.





CHORD PATTERNS:
Before we get started with applying these various Diminished chord shapes, I wanted to review a few popular chord patterns of the Diminished chord, so that you’re well aware of this shape on the guitar neck.

Shape 1). The 6th-string Root Mi7(b5), Half-Diminished



Shape 2). The 5th-string Root Mi7(b5), Half-Diminished




Shape 3). The 6th-string Root Diminished 7th chord (Fully Diminished)



Shape 4). The 6th-string Root Diminished 7th




If you want to dig a lot deeper into the world of the “Diminished” chord, covering all three types of Diminished everywhere on the guitar neck, then check out my YouTube lesson titled, “The 3 Levels of Diminished.”






CHORD APPLICATIONS:
Next, let’s put these chord shapes to use functioning as passing chords between other chords of a key. For simplicity, we’ll keep everything within the key of, “C Major.” Here’s our first examples showing Dim.7 options around our keys, “V-chord”…


Example #1). Same root as V-chord



Example #2). Half-step below the V-chord



Example #3). Half-step above the V-chord Next, we’ll check out an example that applies Dim.7th to create an up-ward chromatic idea.





Example #4). Ascending chromatic option Now, we’ll work out a descending chromatic diminished option that uses the Dim.7 as a chromatic passing chord, plus introduces the sound of a “half-diminished” chord, “Mi7(b5)” to replace the diatonic “II-Chord,” of a major key.




Example #5). Descending chromatic option Another really cool sounding way to apply the Mi7(b5) chord is through a ‘step-by-step’ drop down that precedes the tonic chord of “Major 7”.



Example #6). Drop-down to the Tonic chord My last example is going to use shared chord tones as a way to both substitute and anticipate the arrival of popular diatonic chords.




Example #7). Anticipating the “II-chord” with the “VII-chord” of Minor 7(b5) and substituting the “V-chord” up a ½-step with the “Diminished 7th.”






CONCLUSION:
Using Diminished chords as a way to enhance popular harmonic movements (that already exist within a key) can be really cool sounding.

These chords offer a lot of tension, so they work excellent for playing when you’re “on the way” over to other chords located within either higher or lower inversions.

Take these chord concepts and try substituting them into some of your favorite chord progressions. You can do that in similar ways to what I’ve done here, or you can make up your own ways.

Whatever you decide, I’m sure you’ll find that the Diminished chord effects are a great enhancement to harmony lines and they offer a solid method for situations where you need passing chords.

As always, thanks for joining me, if you liked this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more, (and remember to hit that bell when you subscribe so that you’ll never miss any of my uploads to YouTube).





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
I also for sure want to let you know about the guitar courses available over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses work to help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next video. Bye for now. 

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RHYTHM GUITAR 020: Creating Rhythms (Jazz)

December 14, 2018:
RHYTHM GUITAR 020:
Creating Rhythms (Jazz)

 
 NEW  The 20th lesson of "Rhythm Guitar" continues with a practice routine that has the sessions include composition. These final remaining Rhythm Guitar episodes not only include stylistic examples, but they also include a section for students to create their own original rhythm jams.

A bonus for BASIC and PREMIUM web-site members are the (9) MP3 play-along tracks that will help with learning each rhythm example. 



Paid Web-site members (BASIC and PREMIUM), can watch the associated video lessons and download the detailed PDF handout, along with the MP3 clap /strum play-along tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and MP3's. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons. Be sure to spend some additional time on learning the "Rhythm Jam Challenge" piece that I performed at the start of the lesson in the "Part One" video...

EPISODE 20:
The lesson plan for episode 20 is focused upon performing rhythms found in Jazz guitar styles. Four examples in the lesson will focus on covering; the "Gershwin" folk-jazz feel, the "Freddie Green" strong down-beat feel and I've also included a section covering Latin "Bossa Nova" beats along with a faster Jazz /Blues variation (similar to Be-Bop).


Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE (free on YouTube):  Example one, runs through the folk-jazz rhythm style of "Gershwin's" popular number "Summertime." This groove applies a slow moving jazz /swung feel with a hint of Blues.

PART TWO:  In example two, the groove is applying a strong down-beat in the, "Freddie Green" style. This rhythm focuses on a two-bar phrase with the strong down-beat occurring on the beat of "1" for the first measure. One of the legendary songs that applies this groove is, "Fly Me to the Moon." 




PART THREE:
Example three the "Bossa Nova" feel of Latin rhythm. This single measure phrase has a strong staccato attack on the beat of one with pushes on the down-beat of two and the up-beat of three.

The pattern used in example three can be performed with strumming or by Hybrid style comping. If you choose to strum this pattern, (rather than comp it), the strum would consist of three down-strums and an up-strum on the up-beat of three.

 

PART FOUR:  Example four involves a unique four-bar phrase that generates a faster feel using a Jazz /Blues variation. This groove is based on the heavy accents of the down-beats of, "1 and 4," in the first measure, along with the down-beat accents of beats "3" in the third measure.

This  groove is similar to a be-bop feel with its longer use of rhythmic phrasing. The chord progression establishes a harmony from the key of "C Minor." The chords include (Cm7, C11, Fm7 and F11).



Daily Deal: Washburn Jazz Series J3TSK


 

Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtracks in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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What's the Favorite Soloing Trick of the Best Guitarists?

Using unified Octaves is an excellent way to give your riffs more dimension. They help riffs sound bigger and they can even help a riff come across as if there’s more than one guitar being played. Octave riffs do however require some technical skill to perform, and that's exactly the point of this guitar lesson...




Playing octaves within a musical statement makes that statement sound different. It's an interval based idea, yet it has nothing to do with harmony, (since it's the same note up 8-tones higher).

Guitar players like Wes Montgomery and George Benson applied octaves within a lot of their lines. In fact, octaves were a staple part of their style. The result is that those Montgomery and Benson style riffs sound absolutely fantastic!

There's no doubt that you've heard this sound in styles other than jazz as well. Tons of great rock, and blues players use octaves as well, including Santana and the late-great Jimi Hendrix.

This guitar lesson teaches the basic set-up behind playing Octave shapes on the guitar neck. Then, we continue on with 3 ways that can be used in order to organize guitar riffs using the unified octaves approach.

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EXAMPLE RIFFS:

Example #1).
As a substitute for chords (upon the 6th and 5th strings)



Example #2).
Riff played next to a guitar lick (4th and 3rd guitar strings)




Example #3).
Played as a “Melodic Theme” style riff (5th to 2nd string)






CONCLUSION:
Now that you’ve had a chance to understand how riffs can become further enhanced using octaves, take what we’ve done here and expand on it.

The idea of playing octave riffs as a substitute for chords, or as a statement /fills around licks, or even perhaps as a principle melodic theme, can all be an amazing way to apply octaves.

When octaves are added into a song they instantly boost the dynamic of the musical part and they push the effect of the phrase with a larger scope to the sound.

Just have a listen to Jimi Hendrix’s song “Purple Haze.” when Jimi adds the octave riff against that “E Minor Pentatonic” lick, they sound perfectly balanced.

I’m sure you’ll enjoy applying these octave ideas in your music! Take some time and work on inventing ways to apply them. You'll get better at the technique and you'll come to really enjoy the impact they create musically as well.



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Thanks for joining me, if you liked this video and lesson plan, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube, (and remember to hit that bell when you subscribe so that you’ll never miss any of my lesson uploads).

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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GUITAR TECHNIQUE 019: Note & Chord Vibrato

December 09, 2018:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 019:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 019: Note and Chord Vibrato

 
 NEW  This unique Creative Guitar Studio course  explores exercises for increasing dexterity and coordination between the hands. The goal of the course is to increase awareness, mobility and control.


Lesson 019 of Guitar Technique studies the technique and practical application of, "Note and Chord" vibrato technique.

Vibrato technique can be performed in several ways. Guitarist Eric Clapton uses a vibrato established from the elbow. Many of the Classical players such as Liona Boyd and Christopher Parkening, use a side to side vibrato. And, rock legend Angus Young (as well as the late great Jimi Hendrix), use the whole-hand vibrato.

This lesson plan focuses upon the whole-hand vibrato technique using several examples that will cover everything from vibrato control to adding vibrato within a melodic line. There are also examples of performing vibrato with multiple tones, (known as "chord vibrato").

The video lessons (along with the PDF handout), will help to clarify how note and chord vibrato techniques can be developed and then applied onto the guitar in several unique ways.

Parts one and two of the lesson will focus on learning to control hand vibrato as well as, learning how to apply vibrato to a melody line.

Parts three and four of the lesson will switch over to the use of vibrato performed over 2 and 3 note chords, as well as, the larger seventh quality chords.
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Exercise one studies the similarity between the half-step waver and the standard vibrato.


PART TWO:  Exercise two focuses on the use of vibrato within a melody line.




PART THREE:
Exercise three adds tones. Deals with creating 2 and 3 note chord vibrato.


PART FOUR:  Exercise four extends the use of vibrato out to larger seventh quality chord types.

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Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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The One Barre Chord Trick Everyone Should Know About

This lesson explains how to expand your knowledge of one of the most important chord layouts used on the guitar... the “Barre” chord. Barre chord shapes are vital to us as guitar players because they open up the neck for many other chord types that are found in other keys. They allow us to play unique chords that are unavailable from within our first position chord set... 




BARRE CHORD BENEFITS:
If you require a chord type that contains an accidental like an, “F# Minor” or perhaps, “Bb Major” you’ll need to know how to use Barre Chords. The Barre Chords allow us access to chord names that use accidentals off of the root. This is not available from out open position set.

Once you get the basics of Barre Chords down, you’ll need to understand something called “Barre Chord Relationships.” This covers the concept of how the Barre Chords are laid out and applied musically on the neck of the guitar. Once you can comprehend "Barre Chord" Relationships you will be able to effectively use Barre Chords anyplace on the guitar.

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If you’re unfamiliar with what Barre Chords are and how to make them you’re going to want to stop this video, and jump over to my popular YouTube lesson on how to make Barre Chords… It’s called, “Winning the Battle over Barre Chords.”


WATCH:
Winning the Battle over Barre Chords



If you're not familiar with Barre Chords, the above video is an excellent lesson to start on, because it covers the primary Barre Chord shapes and how to use them. When (or if you need to watch that video), (do so), then come back here and carry on with the next level of learning for these chord patterns on the guitar neck.


RELATIONSHIP - APPLICATION:
Now, let’s check out some guitar theory relating to how to use this important principle called; “Barre Chord Relationships”



Barre Chord Relationships work closely with the principle called the, "Three Chord Theory."

If you're unfamiliar with that concept, then watch my video, "The "HIDDEN SECRET" Within Thousands of Songs!"


WATCH:
The "HIDDEN SECRET" Within Thousands of Songs!





Barre Chord Relationship #1). Lower neck region, 5th string Root, with the 4th and 5th chords of the key based on the 6th guitar string…



Barre Chord Relationship #2). Middle of the neck region, 6th string Root, with the 4th and 5th chords of the key based upon the 5th guitar string…




This principle of, Barre Chord Relationships, gets used by guitar players all the time to play songs related to literally thousands of pieces across every style of music imaginable.

Once you know how to play Barre Chords, and you comprehend the “Three-Chord” Theory principle of music, you’ll be able to learn songs incredibly fast and you’ll know how to place those songs on the neck for any key signature using the versatility that only barre chords can offer you.

The best part is that you’ll be able to do it all in no time flat!





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
I also want to let you know about the guitar courses that I have over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

The web-site has step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar courses available.

My courses are fantastic for helping you learn to identify what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that totally makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at my website; CreativeGuitarStudio.com

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes