Lazy Players Guide to Learning Guitar

Are you a lazy guitar player? Hey, you probably love playing guitar but just don't have the interest in spending hours upon hours learning scales and theory. 



If this sounds like you, I'm sure you're not alone. In fact, I know that you aren't alone. Thousands of guitar players get bored with theory and technical practice. They just want to play and have fun! 

If you are a LAZY guitarist, I've got some great tips in this post. Tips that with get you focused on the main elements of guitar playing and tips that will bypass all that stuff you might find as, "boring."

WATCH THE VIDEO:



LAZY PEOPLE DO ADD VALUE!
Believe it or not, lazy people do add an important value to society. In an article that was published in “Popular Science Monthly” (back in the year 1920), author and consultant “Frank B. Gilbreth Sr.” evaluated the most efficient techniques of people at work to determine the most effective ways when it came to performing tasks.

What he discovered was pretty amazing. He found that when it came to learning tasks, it was the lazy people in a workplace who developed the best ways of getting tasks done most efficiently.

This research conclusion was based upon the fact that he noticed the lazy people skipped every step of learning something that they considered as needless and unimportant. By taking the approach to learning something based upon skipping needless steps, it yielded a faster way of performing jobs. Interesting observation isn't it... now, what if we applied this to learning the guitar…



STEP 1: Holding the guitar… 
If you’re too lazy to study proper sitting methods, just remember that the guitar is not a stationary object like a piano. We "hold" guitars so its always important to remember that everything begins from the point of finding a comfortable sitting position.

You could also try standing (with a guitar strap slung around your shoulder for standing with your guitar), rather than sitting. Just make sure that you can see the fingerboard. Also, when you hold the guitar make sure it feels comfortable no matter how you have it in your hands.

STEP 2: Picking Something (Notes) 
Playing single notes from popular song melodies is probably one of the easiest and quickest ways for a lazy guitar player to start playing guitar. By playing simple melodies like the guitar line from, “Sunshine of Your Love,” by Cream, or the Rolling Stones’ riff from; "Satisfaction," or even the riff from the “Peter Gunn” theme, you’ll be able to start tracking notes properly.

The other benefit of picking note lines and phrases is that you’ll nail down your single-note line skills. Plus, if you learn popular rock and blues songs, you won’t have to start with those boring cheesy children’s melodies like; “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star,” or “Three Blind Mice.”

Although, those children's melodies are also actually pretty good examples of single-note melodies that you can quickly learn on guitar.




STEP 3: Rhythm /Strumming (Chords)
If you’re lazy and looking for the quickest path to learning to strum the guitar, just jump right into learning songs that focus on chords. Songs that strum chords will keep you motivated (so that you always feel like grabbing the guitar day after day).

Plus, strumming chord songs will introduce you to a bunch of new chord types. So, when it comes to easy songs, the easiest ones to learn will typically involve only 3 or 4 chords. And styles like; Rock, Folk and Blues songs are some of the easiest types to start with.

For example, “Knockin’ on Heavens Door," by Bob Dylan, is a really easy song to strum on guitar. Another easy one is, “Stuck in the Middle with You," by Steelers Wheel... But, there are many more strumming songs that you can try.

Also, keep in mind, that there are a lot of traditional pieces that can also be really good for strumming chords. You’ll want to keep in mind that the more famous that a song is to you, the better and easier it will be for you to learn, know and understand the songs musical sound and rhythmic flow when you go to play it.

STEP 4: Learn to play easy solos 
If you are lazy and just want to begin learning some simple guitar solos, (skipping years of study of the scales and arpeggios), then there’s a lot of really basic solos you can try.

A few that I like showing to my own private students are the leads from; “Wonderful Tonight,” by Eric Clapton. And, the solo from the Beatles, “Day Tripper,” along with the solo from the REM song, “The One I Love.”

These are all really straight-forward guitar leads that will get you soloing quickly - if you’re too lazy to study music theory and scales, and key signatures and all that stuff.




STEP 5: Learn the Pentatonic Scale 
Learning scales is often a huge chore to a lot of lazy guitar players out there, but even the laziest of guitarists will get a lot of mileage out of just learning how to play through the notes of a 6-string root Minor Pentatonic scale.

This scale is incredibly popular and gets performed in literally thousands upon thousands of guitar riffs and solos. It’s sits in an easy to remember box shape on the neck and once you have this pattern down, you’ll be able to play lead to a crazy amount of different songs and riffs in pretty much every kind of music style out there.

For the lazy guitar player, my unique "Frying Pan Method" of learning to use the Pentatonic scale is the fastest and easiest way to go for learning this scale!

STEP 6: Start Noodling (Playing for Fun) 
One of the best ways to get good at guitar fast if you’re really lazy, is after you’ve learned a few chords from songs, (along with a few notes from popular melodies), you can just go and begin getting creative with those single note patterns, and the same goes for strumming chords as well.

In other words, make stuff up on your own using any of the notes as well as, the chords that you’ve become familiar with. Depending upon how naturally creative that you are as a person - in general, you can take some of those notes and chords and begin experimenting right away with making stuff up.

If you are really, really lazy, why go to all that trouble of learning how to play other people’s songs. You can just go and make up your own songs instead! That might even be more fun. Hey, think about it, tons of lazy players do that kind of thing all the time.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
I'd like to end the discussion by saying, thanks for joining me... If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership.

Even if you are a lazy person, there will probably come a point in time when you’ll want something more out of your guitar playing, and you’ll certainly be able to do that on my website.

There’s a FREE membership you can get started with on the site, and later on you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium lesson package and start studying all of the professional guitar courses that I've organized for the members of my website.

Also, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on all of this in the comment section below... if you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more. Thanks again and we'll catch up next week, for another episode of the, "Guitar Blog Insider."

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes



RHYTHM GUITAR 009: Soul, Funk & Reggae

July 13, 2018:
RHYTHM GUITAR 009:
Soul, Funk and Reggae

 
 NEW  The ninth lesson of "Rhythm Guitar" studies the grooves of Soul, Funk and Reggae rhythms.

Four examples covers four detailed rhythmic examples along with seventeen chord shapes that are common to the soul, funk and reggae style. Plus, there's a bonus "Rhythm Challenge" (MP3 Jam Track and TAB's) that applies rhythm guitar layering using chords along with filler lines over a recurring harmony in "D Major."

A bonus for BASIC and PREMIUM web-site members are the MP3 play-along tracks that will help with learning each rhythm example. 



Paid Web-site members (BASIC and PREMIUM), can watch the associated video lessons and download the detailed PDF handout, along with the MP3 clap /strum play-along tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and MP3's. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons. Be sure to spend some additional time on learning the "Rhythm Jam Challenge" piece that I performed at the start of the lesson in the "Part One" video...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE (free):  Example one, stresses the back-beat in soul rhythm guitar. The rhythm part includes a laid back quarter note feel in measures one and two. Measure three and four adopt a strict eighth-note count with accents occurring on the up-beats.

PART TWO:  In example two, funky chord shots are performed using unique sixteenth-note rhythm structures. The first two measures use a meter involving a dotted eighth and a sixteenth over the count. These measures also establish some slight syncopation in bar two. Measures three and four apply a steady sixteenth-note feel with an eighth-note tied into a half-note on the up-beat of two. 




PART THREE:
In example three, the focus is on performing single-string funk. A two-bar rhythmic phrase incorporates steady eighth-notes applied with a pair of 16th's on the down-beat.
 

PART FOUR:  In example four, the feel of the Reggae rhythm is our main study. The feel of the back-beat is heavily emphasized by way of the traditional reggae, "chord chop.".


Daily Deal: Washburn Jazz Series J3TSK


 

Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtracks in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

Legendary (Must Know) Guitar Influences

In this post I'll be discussing a group of FIVE guitarists who made a big impact upon me very early on. Each of these guitarists were introduced to me when I was still quite young. It was way before I was exposed to the likes of; Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen, or Ritchie Blackmore. These players were the ones from the very beginning. And, they formed a direction for my playing that took hold of me for years into the future...

WATCH THE VIDEO:





THE POWER OF INFLUENCE:
I learned about these guitar players from a whole bunch of different sources; i.e., teachers, friends, older guitar players that I would jam with, musicians I would talk music with, people who worked in record stores - I would visit as a kid, as well as, from different books and magazines.

These guitar players were innovative and well known by my older peer groups; they played differently and they had a sound that was unique for their era. The players I’m going to discuss all come from a period of years that spans from the 1930’s out to the 1950’s.

I hope that perhaps some of these classic guitar players from years gone end up as new to you, and that they perhaps turn out to inspire you, just like they did for me.




CHARLIE CHRISTIAN:
The first player I want to name is; “Charlie Christian.” I can remember telling the owner of a small record store in my hometown that I played guitar, and he asked me if I ever tried playing any “Charlie Christian” songs… I said, “Charlie who?”

He handed me an old 7” single (we used to call them a 45) and he said go home and try to learn how to play like this. It was a piece called “Profoundly Blue.” It was a very simple melody, but to me it was my first exposure to what a “Jazz Guitarist” was supposedly doing, and it didn’t seem too difficult.

Charlie's, guitar playing sparked an interest in me for basic guitar melody, and it wound-up piquing my thoughts about these fairly basic sounding jazzy melody lines.

Years later I would discover that Charlie was also a guitar innovator. He was the guy who started playing amplified guitar as a single-note melody line player. In the 1930’s he took a Gibson ES-150 along with a Gibson amp and played "amplified guitar" with a band-leader named “Al Trent.” Audiences were pretty taken a-back by both his skill and by his loud amplified guitar sound.




CHUCK BERRY:
The next player I want to mention comes from the 1950’s era, and it’s none other than the legendary “Chuck Berry.”

When I look back on all my past years of guitar practice, it seems that Chuck Berry’s song “Johnny B Goode,” was one of those “Must Learn,” guitar songs that every kid in my neighborhood (who had a guitar), was trying to learn how to play properly.

It wasn’t until years later (after I kept listening and listening) to all of the subtle sounds of that intro guitar lead from Johnny B Goode, that I finally felt I really was actually playing it note for note perfectly.

It was a tough guitar part for to learn back then. I was learning it in the early 80’s. We had no TABs and no computers, just vinyl records to go by and that’s it. So, learning parts perfectly was a real challenge.

Sometimes it would take weeks to even just save up enough money to buy a single, or find somebody who you could borrow the album off of. But, one thing was for sure, Chuck Berry was a rock guitar innovator. In fact his song “Maybelline” became one of the first rock and roll songs to break through to white audiences.





BO DIDDLEY:
Next, I want to mention, “Bo Diddley.” My first exposure to the 12-Bar Blues jam. When I was a very young teenager I’d often spend Saturday’s at my friend’s house and we’d try playing songs with his Dad and his neighbor who was a drummer.

One day a relative of his neighbor showed up and asked us if we knew how to play, “Before You Accuse Me – Bo Diddley.” He kept saying it’s “just a 12-bar Blues.”

But, the thing was - at that age, I didn’t even know what a 12-bar Blues was. Never mind not having a clue who “Bo Diddley” was.

So, that song (which also happened to have been famously done by CCR in 60’s and by Clapton in the 1980’s), was my first introduction to the 12-bar blues! Plus, the licks in it (along with the phrasing of it) really stuck with me for a very long time afterward.





BB KING:
Next up I want to mention, “BB King.” The first time I heard BB's guitar playing - my first thoughts were on how clean he seemed to play notes. I was used to listening to Blues players that had a much more raw /dirty /gritty style, but BB King was really different and he made an impression on me right away because of how perfect his notes sounded.

Another thing that also intrigued me about BB King, is that one of my first guitar teachers explained to me that BB King was one of the very first guitar players that pioneered string bending and rich deep vibrato.

I remember that I wasn’t very good at either one of those techniques back then, so I started to try and play a lot of leads done the way BB King played them, (to try and get my bending and my vibrato to sound better). The song I can remember (my guitar teacher back then getting me to learn) was BB’s, “Three O’clock Blues.”

That intro was something that I worked on to try and make sound like his vibrato and bends, but somehow it seemed like I could never actually sound like BB King no matter how hard I tried.But, really, who can sound just like BB King!




DUANE EDDY:
The final guitarist I wanted to mention is the man who performed the track that every guitar player in my neighborhood wanted to learn how to play back in the day... And, that was the, “Peter Gunn” theme.

That riff was the biggest thing going when I was a kid learning guitar. And, whether it was my friends, or my parents or relatives, it seemed that at some point I’d get asked to play the, “Peter Gunn,” theme.

This riff was actually written by Henry Mancini, for the American Private Eye TV Show of the same name. But for me (as a kid growing up playing guitar), I’ll always think of guitarist, “Duane Eddy” when it comes to that theme music.

In my parents basement, we had the old vinyl album for this song played by Duane Eddy (I remember it, said “Duane Eddy and the Rebels – In Person”) and the Peter Gunn song was the first track on side one!

For years, I (of course) thought that this was one of Duanes' songs! Mainly because of that album. Overall, his guitar technique and his flashy style was definitely unique and he had the hits to prove it because back in the 50’s and 60’s Duane Eddy was the biggest selling instrumentalist of his day!



VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Well, hey, thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover exactly what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best guitar player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and all together they're the best guitar program that you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time - take care and we'll catch up again on the next post. Bye for now!

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

GUITAR TECHNIQUE 008: Harmonics (Natural & Tap /Touch)

July 08, 2018:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 008:
Harmonics (Natural and Tap /Touch)

 
 NEW  This unique Creative Guitar Studio course  explores exercises for increasing dexterity and coordination between the hands. The goal of the course is to increase awareness, mobility and control.


Lesson 008 of Guitar Technique covers the performance methods that can be used to generate harmonics.

The lesson plan contains several examples that demonstrate a collection of "Natural" harmonics along with the style of harmonic known as the "Tapped" or "Touch Harmonic."

There are six studies that explore these different approaches. The video lessons demonstrate each technique in detail.
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handouts, and the MP3 play along tracks...

Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE:  Example 1a, explains the locations on the neck where "Natural" harmonics occur. These locations provide rich dynamic harmonic overtones at the 5th, 7th and 12th fret locations from the open guitar strings.

In exercise 1b, a collection of 7th position Natural Harmonics are incorporated into a melodic example. Learn the example riff and develop the feel of the part up to a smooth rate and pace.


PART TWO:  Example two is all about application. Natural harmonics in the 5th, 7th and 12th fret positions are included in the melodic phrase. Learn the melodic passage and commit it to memory.

The riff in example 2 applies each of the "Natural" harmonics as both broken and chordal style. Learn to perform each of these harmonic playing techniques as smoothly as possible.




PART THREE:
Exercise three moves into the concept of applying the "Tap" or "Touch" style harmonic. These harmonics are developed off of fretting chords or scale tones.

Exercise 3, focuses on the most common "Tap /Touch" harmonic, the one octave distance harmonic performed off of a fretted chord. Four chord examples are provided in the exercise. Learn to reach up an octave across the neck and "tap /touch" each of them.


PART FOUR:  Exercise four applies the performance of tap /touch harmonic technique over to varied intervals.

The study in example 4a, demonstrates doing the tap /touch at both 5th and 7th fret distance from the established chord pattern.

In example 4b, a performance exercise using tap /touch harmonics focuses on the importance of judging distance. These tap /touch harmonics can be executed at 5th, 7th or 12th fret distances. The study demonstrates practice off of the distance of five frets from a "Dmaj7" chord.

Daily Deal: Washburn Jazz Series J3TSK


 

Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

Music Career Implodes (YOUR FAULT)

It’s easy to decide on a career in music, but that career can quickly implode! If an implosion does happen, it can be very hard to get out of that deep of a rut in life... Just because you "decided" that you wanted to become a really great guitar player, it doesn't necessarily mean that you will have any success at it... 

Being a fantastic guitarist is something that a lot of people pursue, and that idea might work out for them, or it might not. 

You need to seriously consider whether being a guitarist /musician in your life is the best thing to focus on as a goal... 

WATCH THE VIDEO:



Playing music professionally is something that millions upon millions of people can and already do. So, is that a good goal to work toward? Or, is there maybe something else that you could be shooting for. Something still related to music and the guitar, but that is more of the "right thing" for you personally?

You’ve only got one life – you want and need to do things correctly. You want to contribute as much as you can, and build the best life you can. Remember that even the simplest most innocent mistake can really take its toll on you. That's why it's so important to always think everything through and make the best decisions.




YOUR PATH IS BUSINESS – NOT PERSONAL:
There’s a really crazy story that recently went public, about a clarinet player from Montreal Canada’s music school McGill University who gave his new girlfriend total access to all of his personal computer files, records, email - passwords.

She had everything that related to his personal business. And, when it came time for him to complete his music degree, he applied and was accepted to the University of Southern California.

However, his girlfriend became insanely jealous (that he’d be moving away), so she hi-jacked his computer and wrote the University in California declining her boyfriends, “once in a life-time offer,” to study there.

Her boyfriend eventually figured out what she had done, and so he hired a lawyer and he sued her, winning a financial settlement of $375,000 Canadian dollars, (worth about $286,000 US dollars).

But, the moral of the story is that developing toward a career path needs to be looked at as a business. In a business, you would never allow anyone full access to the company records, and the control over the security of the business.

Even your accountant and lawyers would have limited access into your personal company records. So, keep in mind that your career path – whatever you choose - is all business – its not a personal one!




HEALTH Vs. SUCCESS:
There’s an old saying in the music business that far too many young musicians will often give up their health to reach their musical goals.

“When people are young, they can lose their health to get success, and when they’re old, they’ll try and use their success to get back their health.” 

That of course is considering that they actually are successful in their career and have the money available in the future to turn their health around later in their life. Now, this is a slippery slope for musicians because we sit and /or stand in one place a lot to perfect our craft.

Whether that’s sitting or standing to practice, or staying stationary for hours on end to record at our computer work-stations, we as musicians are far too stationary, for far too long, and often times, it really catches up with musicians in their later years.

So, remember that regardless of what you do in your music career, you’ve got to focus on your health – every day - above all else your health is paramount. Never neglect it for success, that’s a huge mistake that could lead you to a point eventually where you’ll be on the fence with your health, between being able to turn things around for your health, and possibly not being able to turn things around.




YOU WILL HAVE PROBLEMS - ATTACK THEM WHEN THEY ARRIVE:
One of the really lousy things about being an entrepreneur of any kind, (and trust me – being any type of a musician is all about being incredibly entrepreneurial), is the lousy things involved with this field and the instability of it all. This business is crazy, and bad news will hit you at some point in some way!

The musician’s lifestyle is not for everybody who sets out to live it. This field actually only works for the minority who step into it. That’s why you’ll find so many musicians married to others who have really stable jobs.

Or, more common, you’ll find musicians who have tried doing the musical path through their 20’s, but into their 30’s they end up pursuing far more stable employment directions.

Sometimes, employment related to music, and other times unrelated. All of this happens because playing a musical instrument is only the means to an end. Playing a guitar isn’t the end goal of what we want out of our career, it’s only the vehicle we’ve chosen to get us where we can see ourselves in the end.

The goal isn’t to just play guitar, the goal is to make music with it and to do something creative using the guitar that will manifest a stable life. And, the highest level of where we want to get to and reach long term is to have a good life. That’s the end goal - is having a good life.

So when the problems arise, (and they will), you've got to attack them. Hit back fast and hard and crush them head on. This method is the only way to deal with problems. You need to throw down hard and nip the issues in the bud fast!




FINAL THOUGHTS:
Before I wrap things up, I wanted to just hit one last point, make one final statement, and that is this... most people probably aren’t going to listen to this advice here in this video.

And, that’s basically just human nature. The best advice is often lost. People get lost in the message, or they are stuck thinking that they can trust everybody, [like that McGill clarinet student who gave his girlfriend (of 5 min.), all access to his computer and to his email].

It's  too bad but it's true. This field of work is insane, you can’t trust everyone you meet, your health will take a beating and things are going to get stupid for you at some point.

So, remember to stay focused, and keep your cards close to your chest. Trust is earned over a very long period of time.

Also, your health… Your health is the most important thing you have, you cannot neglect it.

And, remember you are going to have massive problems hit you during your career. But, what your goal is centers around the long term establishment of a good life as a musician.

Do everything to reach the highest point on the, “Good Life,” scale as you possibly can. Maintain your health, study your music and your skills at the right rate and pace for you.

Maintain a good balance of all the other things in your life and focus on finding the right people to interact with – people who will have your best interests at heart. Those are the key factors right there.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
I'd like to end the discussion by saying, thanks for joining me... If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership.

When you want more, you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium lesson package and start studying the guitar courses I've organized for the members of my website.

Also, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on all of this in the comment section below... if you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more. Thanks again and we'll catch up next week, for another episode of the, "Guitar Blog Insider."
___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes

The Oldest Musical Skill

Do you go through a battle during every new song learning process? Is it a difficult battle that can send you into fits of frustration with thoughts about how your personal ability is truly developing? Are you having too many negative personal feelings for how your success rate is going? 



This area is what many musicians call the "familiar vs. memorized.” In this video discussion I’ll go over what this means and how you can learn to control it so that you can become a much better student of the guitar.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



I’d like to begin, by having us playing a simple “C Major” scale for you in the open position.” (Play 2nd string “C” to 5th string “C”).

"C Major" Scale:


This sound is one of the oldest musical sounds – so old that its said to date back all the way to 4000 BC during the age of the Egyptians when they had created some of the very first harps and flutes. I guess nobody really knows how old this scale sound is, but I think we can rest assured that it’s really, really old. It's a sound that's familiar to all of us.




Familiarity is King:
When musicians set out to perform a musical arrangement, we are largely in a battle with our senses. There’s auditory, (the sense of how the music needs to sound). There’s a visual component (to how we’re seeing the notes in respect to how they each sit on the instrument). And, there’s also a physical side, for how we feel (when we perform notes with our hands, our wrist and the angle and feel of the arm in alignment to the instrument).

The more that all of these components come together in the most familiar sense for us, the easier it will be to perform a musical part.

In the largest sense, this is basically WHY we practice in the first place. We want to build up these feelings of familiarity. The more that every “sound and sense” for a piece becomes familiar to us, the better that we’ll be able to perform any musical number.



Memorization Vs. Familiarization:
If we are handed a music chart for a piece (a piece that we already know how it sounds), then learning how to perform that piece just became a whole lot easier. We already have a musical memory for the song. We know how it’s supposed to sound.

There’s nothing to new learn with respect to the musical contour, or the flow of the rhythm of the beat in time, or where accents need to fall. We already know that stuff – because we know that song. We can sing it, and we can hum it, so learning to visually and physically perform it just became a whole lot easier.

But, things are quite different when we do not know how a song is supposed to sound. If we’re handed a chart for a piece, that we don’t know, it is extremely important to find a performance of the piece – right away. We’ll have to learn the feel and the flow and memorize the accents and learn how to sing it.



Be Patient:
If you can learn to be patient with every new piece of music that comes your way, and if you can learn to respect all of the physical barriers involved with learning any song, (regardless of whether you know it - or not), then you’re going to start down the path of developing music’s oldest skill.

The skill of balancing what is familiar to you with what needs to become added to your memory banks. The process of developing this skill is fairly simple. Just begin the study of every new piece with a self-check of deciding if the piece is familiar. Can you sing it? If not, you’ll need to learn to sing it.

You’ll need recordings, or a teacher to perform it, or some form of representation. And, once you learn to respect that crossroad of Memorization Vs. Familiarization, your sense of calm and relaxed study for every piece you sit down to work on will be met with a new sense of calm and self-control.




"Familiar" is the First Step to Perfection:
So, once again, if we were to go back to that basic “C Major” scale. It has a familiarity to it. It generates a sound that’s hundreds of years old. And even if I were to change around the order and sequence of those scale tones, (play the Spanish sequence below)...

 "C Major" Spanish Sequence:


The above sequence, is still simply using the notes of the "C Major" scale. So, there’s still some sense of familiarity as to what lies there from that original scale.

You might have to spend a little time on learning the new note order of the new sequence, but there tends to always be something familiar within every new song, something that offers a sense of recognition to us.

CONCLUSION:
And, this is why we practice, this is why we tend to get better over time, (after playing many different songs, and scales and musical ideas in all kinds of different keys and time signatures).

The oldest musical skill is to have a belief that there’s always a unique balance that can be found between familiarity vs. memorization! The greatest musicians on Earth all believe this and use it upon the learning of every new musical piece.

The longer we play, the more experienced that we become in applying this concept.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time - take care and we'll catch up again on the next video. Bye for now!

___________________________________________________

GET GOOD NOW - JOIN THE MEMBERS AREA


Join Now

Guitar Chords | F Chord | Guitar Notes | G Chord | C Chord | D Chord | Guitar String Notes