How to Perform 2 Octave Scales

Are you bored with your current state of scale application? Want to discover more range? Well, you're going to love this lesson... get ready for more fingerboard range, and the ability to create dual register melodic concepts! This scale idea allows all that and the ability for guitar players to have greater control over longer scale layouts on the neck. This post is all about "Two-Octave" scales... 




Learning how to most effectively line up one lower register section of a scale across the fingerboard into a second scale out-line into a new octave range offers a guitar player many advantages.

I know it sounds a little complex, but he real trick to doing this is centered around the fingering that we use at the very point where we make the scale pattern shift. If you do that fingering correctly, you’ll have an excellent transition point as you begin playing into your second octave.

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Two octave scale application is a great process to study because it makes you think a lot more about connecting scales, (than as if you were to only study scales in one position).

Plus, two octave scale shapes establishes longer scale runs. When practiced with effective fingerings, you’ll not only start playing scales with more notes, but you’ll play scales faster.





THE SHAPES:
The first 2-Octave scale pattern that I want to introduce will be based off of the 5th guitar string. We'll perform it from off of the root of a “C” Major Scale.

(1). “C Major” 5th String Root – 2 Octave Scale:




The next 2 Octave scale pattern I want to run through will be another Major scale. This time we’ll be focused on playing the pattern from off of the 6th string.

(2). “G Major” 6th String Root – 2 Octave Scale:




Now you’re starting to get a good idea for how these 2 octave scale patterns can function on the neck. 

When they are played efficiently (using a good fingering approach for both ascending as well as descending with the patterns), they can be performed quickly and easily.

Before we wrap things up, I also wanted to demonstrate how this two octave scale approach can be used with a Minor Tonality scale as well. 

For our final pattern, we’ll run through a scale layout in the key of “D Minor” using a two octave 5th string root scale. 

(3). “D Minor” 5th String Root – 2 Octave Scale:








FURTHER STUDY:
If you’d like to learn more about guitar topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and have a look at my “Intermediate and Advanced” Guitar Programs.

Those courses, not only break down the entire guitar fingerboard (with a step-by-step octave pattern process), but the Advanced spends a lot of time teaching the scale shapes. 

The scales are applied along with melodic exercises and technique drills. The exercises work together in a manner that helps you understand the entire guitar neck.

And, it does it all in a very detailed and comprehensive way - so that you can use the information to move forward as a musician. You'll end up composing and performing music not only better, but you'll do it easier as well.





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Be sure to head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses have been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com


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EAR TRAINING 001: Matching Tone & Pitch

January 20, 2019:
EAR TRAINING 001:
EAR TRAINING 001: Matching Tone and Pitch

 
 NEW  Musicians learn the importance of being able to internalize rhythm early on. The same must also be done with the ability to accurately listen to and recognize musical, tone and pitch. The EAR TRAINING course offered at Creative Guitar will help guitar players drastically improve their sense of note identification, recognition and recall...


Lesson 001 of Music Reading consists of four examples targeting the development of gaining ability to accurately match tone (musical sound) and pitch (the highness or lowness of a sound).

EAR TRAINING 001 - DISCLAIMER:
This guitarists ear training course is not designed to be used as a "beginners" note recognition program.

If you are a guitarist who has no background in basic music theory, key signatures, treble-clef staff /note recognition, or foundational rhythmic duration, then it is advised that prior to working on this course, you study the "Introductory" and "Intermediate" guitar player programs prior to working on this course.

Those preliminary courses, (for beginners and Intermediate players), will lay the foundation for understanding how the nuts and bolts of ear training relate musically and how the principles relate to guitar (as well as other instruments).

Those
preliminary courses will also help guitar players better comprehend rhythm duration and key signatures.
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(1). Part one, of lesson one Ear Training, involves matching pitch (singing) across the tones of the key signature of "G Major." 


The example scale (discussed and demonstrated in video one), is pitch matched from off of the guitars 6th-string "G" at third fret.

(2). Part two, continues with another example of sound from the Major key signature. A key of "C Major" pitch matching exercise is provided off of the guitars 5th-string, "C" located on the third fret.

(3). Part three, alters the focus of our tone /pitch matching studies toward the minor tonality. A key of "G Minor" pitch matching exercise is provided off of the 6th-string, third fret "G Minor" scale layout.

(4). Part four, works out another minor tonality tone /pitch matching exercise based off of an open 5th-string, key of "A Minor" scale layout.

(5). Solfege Tutorial: The last two pages of the PDF handout for lesson one Ear Training describes the history and the details involved with using the popular pitch matching system that is known world-wide as, "Solfeggio."
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Study the method for singing and properly matching into the tone and pitch for the "G Major" scale.


PART TWO:  Work through the matching tone /pitch exercises in video lesson two, using the key signature of, "C Major."




PART THREE:
Study the matching tone /pitch exercises in video lesson three, using the key signature of, "G Minor.".


PART FOUR:  Practice the the matching tone /pitch exercises in video lesson four, using the key signature of, "A Minor."

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Paid members can download the handout and MP3 audio in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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4 Guitar Drills You Should Do Each Day

How do you begin your "Guitar Playing Day?" For most guitar players it begins without thinking too much about their technique and flow of their accuracy. Sadly, most players will just grab the 'ol axe and churn out a few Blues licks, or maybe just jam-out on that old classic rock riff (you've played for years). And, while that's "OK" there is a much better way to start your day on the guitar... 






THE 5-minute GUITAR WORKOUT:
This lesson breaks down four simple ideas that you can do in as little as 5 min. prior to digging into anything else on guitar...

Integrate and Coordinate:
Learn how to integrate a small group of simple guitar technique drills in as little as five minutes. These drills work great for being able to balance left and right hand coordination. Plus, they’re also nice for relaxing your hand, wrist and arm muscles, (to avoid injury).

These drills are also very good for helping you when it comes to improving your picking skills so that all of your guitar playing technique (during the rest of your day), goes better for you in the long haul.

WATCH THE VIDEO:




DRILL #1).
Our first drill, is just going to be a, “Finger Isolation Exercise.” Isolation exercises are a really nice way to start your day, because this exercise works well for relaxing the hand and for getting each individual finger moving both on their own and also together as a group.

Start by relaxing your fret-hand, (keep in mind that you can do this study with both hands), on a flat surface such as a desk, or the back of your guitar's sound-board. Be sure to level your wrist on the flat surface.


Then, isolate finger movements creating a cycle of finger moves that will work individual fingers, as well as, groups of fingers.


NOTE:
Watch the video lesson for a full explanation and demonstration.





DRILL #2).
Our second drill is going to be the, “5th to 2nd string - Fixed Finger Exercise”… This drill works extremely well at isolating our individual fingers of the fret-hand for better accuracy throughout our playing day.

The drill begins by focusing on the 3rd guitar string where we begin by establishing our primary playing position with every finger established in a position on the guitar string.


 After establishing the principle position upon the 3rd guitar string, the next step will be shifting paired fingers between the 5th to the 2nd strings.


NOTE:
Watch the video lesson for a full explanation and detailed demonstration.






DRILL #3).
The third drill acts as a picking and fingering "reach and pick" accuracy drill for improving the fretting-hand skill as well as, the tracking ability of the picking-hand.

The pattern of notes forms the layout of tones found in the "Whole-Tone" scale. Try playing the study as it is shown in the TAB below. Then practice it off of other fret-board positions on each new practice day.


NOTE:
Watch the video lesson for a full explanation and detailed demonstration of the "reach and pick" accuracy drill. The drill is in 12/8 time, so make sure that you count the pace accordingly when you practice the drill on guitar.





DRILL #4).
The fourth drill is going to be the “Chromatic String Cross-over." This exercise is a really nice one for building more coordination between the pick-hand and the fret-hand.

This drill also acts as an especially helpful exercise for getting better at the picking we do between the guitar strings. “Crossing Over,” string groups is something that is important to get very good at, since it’s common when it comes to playing melodies.



NOTE:
Watch the video lesson for a full explanation and detailed demonstration of the "chromatic string cross-over" drill. 





CONCLUSION:
Well, there you have it, four exercises that you can do in less than 5 min. when you’re starting your day to help you maintain better more accurate and more relaxed “left and right hand” ability and to improve coordination.

If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my “Guitar Technique” course.

There’s a ton of great examples in there that show all kinds of more advanced guitar technique ideas.

Plus, if you join my site as a Premium member, you’ll receive a FREE copy of my popular Guitar Technique eBook. It’s a 28 page download jam-packed full of different studies for mastering your overall technical skill and improving your playing ability on the guitar.






VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Be sure to head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses have been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com


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Lesson Learned - The Phrygian Workout

Do you know where and how you would  use the scales and chords of the Phrygian mode? What types of chord movements will best establish the Phrygian sound? What scales associate in the best ways with the Phrygian tonality? These are the questions about Phrygian most guitar players can't answer - but we'll cover them here in detail on this post...





For a lot of guitar players the application of modes like Dorian and Mixolydian are fairly straight forward because they so closely relate to Blues, (and Blues is highly popular).

One of the first scales we learn how to use in music is the Minor Pentatonic (and its companion the Blues scale). However, when making the jump to “Phrygian” mode, things get significantly different.

The Phrygian mode is more like Natural minor with the added twist of having a lowered 2nd. This makes Phrygian unique in both its scale application and its chord harmony.

In the lesson I will be analyze and then play through a Phrygian mode progression that you can use elements of for developing the unique sound of Phrygian.

WATCH THE VIDEO:




PHRYGIAN ANALYSIS:
The phrygian mode is minor and contains all of the formatting of the standard "Natural Minor" scale. This includes the minor 3rd, 6th and 7th tones.

However, Phrygian also adds a unique twist off of the second degree. That degree is lowered by a half-step. This creates a unique color of a "Minor 2nd," tone between the scales Tonic and the second step.

In creating chord progressions, this degree is the critical highlight for injecting the Phrygian flavor. When this step is combined with the push of the VIIth step chord in minor harmony we can easily achieve a strong Phrygian harmonic backdrop.

Example Progression:




PHRYGIAN LEAD /SOLOING APPLICATION:
Now that you have a basic idea about the process of how to create interesting Phrygian harmonies, let’s actually use that, “B Phrygian” chord progression to compose a “B” Phrygian melody line.

When composing Phrygian melody (for this "B Phrygian" mode progression), our focus is going to be based on the Tonal center chord of, “B Minor 7” and also on the lowered 2nd degree chord of, “C Major 7.”

Along with those chords, we will also focus on the pull that gets generated (in the progressions 4th measure), drawing us back to the root chord by way of that final “A” power-chord.

Let’s hear what a melodic phrase built using these concepts sounds like when it focuses on all of those areas of our, “B” Phrygian progression...

Example Melody:



IMPORTANT:
In the "B Phrygian" mode melody (above), our highlight tones focus strongly on the "B" and "C" tones of the Phrygian scale. Other important tones are the Minor 3rd's and the Minor 7th's. Arpeggio offerings that are applied upon each chord are also strong ways for connecting the melodic flow across the progression.






CONCLUSION:
In wrapping up, I do have a few suggestions that I want to leave you with. They have to do with some important topics that you should study "prior" to really digging into the Phrygian mode soloing along with Phrygian song composition.

Scale Patterns: The first thing I want to stress is; the importance of learning Phrygian fingerboard patterns for this modal scale on the guitar fret-board. You should know at least 2 or 3 fingering patterns on the neck. Also, related to this is the study of the relationships for Phrygians various arpeggios along with what sounds out of Pentatonic sclaes appeal to you.

Chord Harmony:  If you do have an interest in this sound - you should also learn harmonies that offer up the Phrygian effect. A song like Joe Satriani’s “War” is a really good example.

So is the piece “Flame-Sky” from guitar greats; “Santana and John McLaughlin.” In fact “Flame-Sky” applies the same Minor to Major ½ step movement that I used in our chord progression example for this lesson plan.

Compose and Create: When we practice making up our own chord progressions it allows us the opportunity to apply the various harmonic movements that are important to learning the most critical elements of our Phrygian lesson plan.

By transcribing works and re-arranging them and by inventing new melodic and harmonic examples, we can stretch our ear so that there's a strong connection to the sound of the scale and how it can be used to make music.





EXPLORE MODES FURTHER:

If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one (and many others), join my members site as a free member and have a look at my, “Using the Major Scale Modes” eBook.

There’s a ton of great examples in my Modes eBook. The examples demonstrate all kinds of more advanced major scale mode ideas…

The Using the Modes eBook will work fantastic as a way to help introduce you to many of the most important scale and chord concepts when it comes down to using all the major scale modes.





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Be sure to head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses have been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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How to Practice Solos for Advanced Musical Growth

Are you getting tired of playing lead and practicing guitar soloing in the same way all the time? Sick of using the plain old Pentatonic scale day in - day out? Are you feeling bored with what you end up playing? ...Expanding how you practice guitar soloing is just as important as the subjects and exercises that you choose to work on...




ADVANCED SOLOING:
One of the cool things about running a guitar education web-site is hearing from so many different students and getting a chance to discuss with them what types of problems they face, as they study guitar.

Something that comes up time after time is helping students realize that “how you practice something” is just as important as the subjects and exercises that you choose to work on.

And, there’s nothing more popular for guitar players to work on than playing and composing melody. In this episode we’re going to study how to tie melodic ideas directly into the chords being used in a progression.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



MAIN PROGRESSION:
The chord progression below will be our primary line of thought used for the example solos within this lesson plan.

Key of "A Minor"






BASIC /SIMPLE SOLOING:
There are a lot of ways that guitar players can approach trying to organize a melody over a group of chord changes like the one shown above. 

We can solo into the basic key center approach and not be too overly concerned about rhythm. It’s the easiest process, because once we determine the key of our progression, all we need to do is just solo in that key.

In our case, the key is “A Minor,” so we could just grab the notes of an, “A Minor” pentatonic. There’s no need to really place much consideration on the notes, or how we apply rhythm content. 

We can just jam around in almost any way we want - and come up with a lead guitar part that works decent enough…

Let me give you an example of how this “Basic” Pentatonic and “Simple” rhythm approach would sound across our key of “A min.” chord progression…

Example 1).



As you can tell, the example one basic /simple Pentatonic approach (without much concern for rhythm structure), does work. But, there’s another method that’s better.

It’s a little more advanced because it takes the approach a few-steps further.





ADVANCED SOLOING:
More advanced soloing practice methods will isolate chord tones for each chord used in every measure. The advanced idea uses intervals (to more closely relate to each chords harmony - chord by chord - in a way that can produce incredibly solid melody lines).

Plus, this more advanced lead guitar method also takes into account a more elaborate use of rhythm, by incorporating more syncopation and a wider assortment of note duration types.

Example two (below) is a demonstration of how a more advanced melody approach for playing solos, could be applied over those key of “A Minor” chord changes…

Example 2).



As you can tell, the solo becomes more advanced sounding when we think more in the way of intervals (rather than just using the common Pentatonic scale). 

And, (if you couple with that with), paying closer attention to the types of rhythms that could be applied when soloing, you’ll wind up with an end result of creating lead guitar phrases that not only sound more advanced.

The best part is that your soloing will also relate much better to each chord being used in your song’s guitar solo.





GUITAR SOLOING COURSE:
If you’d like to learn more about topics like this one and many others, join my members site as a free member and start looking through my, “Guitar Soloing” course.

There’s a ton of great examples showing all kinds of more advanced soloing ideas in that course. Once you start study in the course it will work great to help introduce you to many of the most important guitar soloing concepts used in all kinds of musical situations and styles.





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Be sure to head over to review all of the guitar courses that are found on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available.

The courses have been designed so as to help you learn to identify where you're at, and what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that simply makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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