RHYTHM GUITAR 014: Pop & Contemporary Rhythms

September 21, 2018:
RHYTHM GUITAR 014:
Pop and Contemporary

 
 NEW  The 14th lesson of "Rhythm Guitar" explores the popular groves and feel of pop and adult contemporary music. The lesson plan is organized around some of the most common rhythm styles used in all forms of pop music including; Dance, Hip-Hop, R&B, Blues-Soul, Progressive Pop, and Adult Contemporary.

A bonus for BASIC and PREMIUM web-site members are the (9) MP3 play-along tracks that will help with learning each rhythm example. 



Paid Web-site members (BASIC and PREMIUM), can watch the associated video lessons and download the detailed PDF handout, along with the MP3 clap /strum play-along tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and MP3's. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons. Be sure to spend some additional time on learning the "Rhythm Jam Challenge" piece that I performed at the start of the lesson in the "Part One" video...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE (free on YouTube):  Example one  takes a close look at a common sounding repetitive groove which would be generally applied across the styles of Hip-Hop and Dance Rhythm.

PART TWO:  In example two, the beat shifts to the 1950's classics with a Blues-Soul rhythm based upon the swing-shuffle. In this rhythm, the groove operates around an R&B effect composed of tighter shots that include space (rests). 




PART THREE:
In example three, a Progressive Pop progression in the musical direction of bands like; Genesis, XTC or Al Stewart applies an interesting mix of chord shots and filler lines.

The groove is based upon a more complex slightly syncopated rhythm that involves mixing a group of six chords from the key of "E Minor," over a 2-bar riff that includes filler tones.

 

PART FOUR:  Example four heads into the sounds of Adult Contemporary. This category includes the music of easy listening singers - the likes of - Johnny Mathis and Billy Ocean to Ed Sheeran, as well as, highly polished Adult Contemporary groups like; Air Supply, Fleetwood Mac and The Moody Blues.

Example four applies a steady sixteenth-note feel that does not attack the beat of 2 or 4. A tied rhythm off of the final sixteenth of beats one and three eliminates the attack on beats 2 and 4.



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Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtracks in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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Do This at EVERY Chord Practice

There is one thing that you need to make sure you’re doing every single time you train yourself on the practice of guitar chord progressions...




At every chord practice session you need to be doing parallel chord harmony transitions. And, here’s why... When we only study chord movements in diatonic harmony, we’re only looking at a portion of the chords we have at our disposal.

But, when we study the chords of the parallel key centers, we end up with the majority of chords we’re going to encounter during the learning of new songs, or from any songs that we’re going to compose…

Since major and minor keys are the foundation of all styles of music, we need to know and understand how both sides of harmony function independently and also how they can function together.

WATCH THE VIDEO:


The first thing that we’re going to do is strengthen our understanding for parallel keys. To get started with this, we'll study the key signature for one of the most common major keys we use when studying music, the key of “C Major.”

ESTABLISH THE KEY:
The key of “C Major” has no sharps and no flats making it an excellent key for doing music theory. Since the key is based on the major tonality, we will have a “C Major” chord built from off of the first step.



HARMONIZE THE KEY:
Next, you’ll need to fully understand what the rest of the key harmonizes out to after that. This is called, "Harmonization," of the major key into chords. It moves across the notes of the key going step-wise, and constructs a chord on each degree of the scale.





PICK A PARALLEL:
Next, we will to switch the tonality of this key of “C Major,” so that we can learn about the notes and the chords that operate alongside of the minor tonality (off the same tonic note of “C”). This is called "Parallel Harmony."

In using Parallel Harmony we need to become familiar with what scale tones and which chords exist within a parallel running key to, "C Major." For our example, we will use the key of “C Minor.” Let’s begin with the scale tones for a “C Minor” scale.



ANALYZE THE PARALLEL KEY:
The key of “C Minor” has three flats located off of the notes found on the; 3rd, 6th and 7th degrees. Off of our “C Minor” scale this winds up being the notes of; “Eb,” “Ab,” and “Bb.” Now, that we understand these notes we can plug-in the chord types that exist on each scale step as well.





COMPOSING PITCH AXIS JAMS:
Now that we’ve established each tonality operating off of the same tonic note, (in this case we’ve established keys of “C Major and C Minor”). We can next move forward to begin building practice progressions that borrow and integrate chords from each tonality so that they’re applied within the same progression.

Let’s start with building an example progression that’s based in the key of “C Major” but it will borrow (Pitch Axis) on chords from “C Minor.”

Example Jam #1). Pitch Axis from "C Major"


In the above progression the “C” chord is our “I-(tonic) Chord.” The “G Major” is our keys, “V-Chord.” The “F major” is this keys “IV-chord.”

However, that “Fm” chord is a borrowed chord called an “IV-Minor” and it is from the key of, “C Minor.” So is that “Bb Major.” It’s the “flat-VII-major” borrowed from the key of “C Minor.”

As you can tell, applying these parallel running chord changes can make for some great chord movements and some really cool harmonies.

But, we’re not done yet, because this same principle can also be approached from the perspective of a Minor key as well. Let’s jam out on another chord progression, but this time we’ll jam things out off of the key of, “C Minor.”

Example Jam #2). Pitch Axis from "C Minor"



The, “Cm” chord is our “I-(tonic) Chord.” The “Ab Major” is our keys, “VI-Chord.” The “Bb major” is this keys “VII-chord.” But, that “F major” chord is a borrowed chord of “IV-Major” from the key of “C Major.”

The, “D Minor.” It’s the “II-minor” chord also borrowed from the key of “C Major.” And, there’s more borrowed harmony happening off of that “G Major.” It’s the “V-Major” chord and it’s also on loan from the key of, “C Major.”



CONCLUSION:
There will be music that you’ll come across in your own jams and during your band rehearsals will include these types of unique borrowed chord harmonies. And, if you’re unfamiliar with them, it’s guaranteed that these chord moves will quite likely cause you confusion.

However, by simply putting in just a little time during your practice day (building a few progressions like these), you’re going to help yourself become a lot more familiar with  borrowed chord movements.

That study and awareness will not only help you become a better more well-rounded musician, but you’ll also be able to improve your ear. A better ear will help you start hearing common chord changes much better than as if you never studied these parallel key harmonies.

Also, keep in mind that the way we all get better as musicians and as guitar players is by challenging yourself with new melodic and new harmonic directions. This exercise is perfect for doing that.



VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Hey, thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...As always, if you enjoyed this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more, until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next video. Bye for now!

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GUITAR TECHNIQUE 013: Two Hand Tapping

September 16, 2018:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 013:
Two-Hand Tapping

 
 NEW  This unique Creative Guitar Studio course  explores exercises for increasing dexterity and coordination between the hands. The goal of the course is to increase awareness, mobility and control.


Lesson 013 of Guitar Technique studies how to play notes like Eddie Van Halen using that infamous two-hand tapping approach.

Two-Hand taps operate by way of synchronizing the left and right hands together to generate a series of scale or arpeggio tapped phrases that occur at a vert fast pace. 


The end result is both unique physically and musically. The technique generates extremely fast note groupings (as well as, a flashy attention getting sound).

The exercises in this lesson plan will help guitar players develop two-hand tapping through detailed on screen demonstrations of the hands performing a group of tapped studies that are both musical and physical.
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Exercise one introduces the tapping method through a discussion on left and right hand technique. Simple tapping using "start tones" will help the guitarist integrate tapping into their skill-set.

Exercise (1a), learning how to tap from a single start tone

Exercise (1b), double-tapping from off of the start tone



PART TWO:  Exercise two focuses on how to start a tapped phrase from off of a fretted tone. Chord and arpeggio awareness is also discussed with a breakdown of; chord tones, intervals and scale tone combinations that can be applied to create our tapped arpeggio lines.

The riff in exercise (2a), outlines an "Am6" chord through intervals

The riff in exercise (2b), adds a scale tone to create a new chord (the chord of D7).




PART THREE:
Exercise three explores the method and the note sequences that are used by guitar legend "Eddie Van Halen."

Eddie applies a unique order to his two-hand tapping structure. This unique order and sequence of tones generates a tapped phrase that ends up sounding unique to Eddie's sound and playing style.



PART FOUR:  Exercise four involves learning a two-bar 16th-note triplet tapping exercise that both crosses strings vertically and includes open strings across the note run.

As your tapping technique improves, the next steps to take with the technique will involve moving vertically along and across guitar strings, as well as, adding open strings alongside of fretted tones
.

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Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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How to Easily Write a Song a Day

Anyone can write a song if they know a few basic theory concepts such as the notes of a key and how chords are constructed within the key. This lesson explains the entire process in simple - easy to follow - terms...



I often talk about how valuable it is to know and understand your; basic music theory, key signatures, guitar neck layout, your scales and your chords...

In this post I’m going to show you how easy it is to apply just a small part of that information and very quickly (and very easily) use it to knock out a basic musical structure of a songs verse and chorus section.

All it takes to do this is to begin by selecting a key that your song will be composed in and then, assign, what we’re going to call “song section” bookends.

Those Book-Ends will lock down the section of music we’re working on from our key. After that, it’s simply a matter of choosing chords to fit “in-between” those bookends in order to crate verse or chorus sections.

WATCH THE VIDEO:



ESTABLISH A KEY CENTER:
The first order of business is to establish a key signature. For this exercise, we’ll be using the key signature of “A Major.”

Let’s take a closer look at how this key functions (with both its notes and with its diatonic chords)…





COMPOSING A VERSE:
Next, we’re going to organize the construction of our Verse section from the chords and notes of our established key of “A Major.”

Since we’re using the key signature for “A Major” let’s keep things simple, and make our first chord (for our songs verse), be the chord of, “A Major.”

The process that we’re going to use to establish this verse section, will simply involve beginning with that “A Major” chord, and then we’ll be looking toward resolving on that chord as well.

In between, we can select any other chord from our key that we’d like. They’re all going to work-out, because we’ve already established our key signature and the chords that belong to it. Try to compose your own Verse right now…




Here's an example of what my own verse example section turned out as with the chords from the key of "A Major."





COMPOSING A CHORUS:
The next thing that we’re going to do is establish our songs "Chorus" section. To do that, we’re going to simply look at the chords we have available in our key of “A Major” and pick a primary chord from the key signature to function as the bookends of our Chorus.

For the bookends of our Chorus example, I’ve decided to choose the 6th chord of the key. The 6th chord is an “F# Minor” chord.

In between those "F#" minor chords, we can select any other chord from our key that we’d like. They’re all going to work-out because we’ve already established our key signature and the chords that belong to it. Try to compose your own Chorus right now…



Here's an example of what my own verse example section turned out to be with the chords from the key of "A Major."




Now, that we’ve organized a Verse and a Chorus section, play through each section and listen to what each example sounds like with the chords that have been decided upon for each part.



CONCLUSION:
As you can tell, this process of choosing a key, establishing a starting chord to function for the Verse, then another chord to function for the chorus - is a fast and easy way to write a song.

In fact it’s so easy, that you could probably write a new song using this approach - every single day. As time goes on, you can expand sections and even begin testing chords that are non-diatonic as well.

Plus, this method is a fantastic way to compose music no matter what level of musician you’re at as a player. Also, this system (I’ve shown here) is really quick to learn, and understand and anyone can start applying it musically right away.





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find.

The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...As always, if you enjoyed this lesson, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube.

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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4 Simple Jazz Chords

These simple 3-note jazz chord patterns are going to be some of the easiest shapes that you’ve ever tried to play. The patterns I’m going to run through here are almost all identical in their shape, the fingerings are surprisingly the "exact same" and you can even use them in a Jazz progression (that I play it at the beginning of the video)...





WATCH THE VIDEO:



CHORD #1).
The first chord (of our group of four chord patterns) is from the key of “D” and it’s going to be a chord that’s used in almost every jazz progression out there, it’s the Major 7th.

So, here’s a popular 5th string root example that uses this chords most important color tones, (the Root, major 3rd and major 7th). From our 5th string / 5th fret location / off of a “D Major7” chord / those notes work out to be; “D, F#, and C#).




CHORD #2).
The next chord shape is for the 6th chord of our harmony inside the key of “D Major,” it’s the chord of “B Minor 7.”

Our simple version will once more only be using three notes. Again the primary color tones of the “Root, minor 3rd and minor 7th.” From our 6th string / 7th fret location / off of an easy to play, “B Minor 7” chord / those notes work out to be the tones of; “B, D, as well as, the note of A).





CHORD #3).
Next, we’ll be checking out the second chord degree of our key of “D Major” harmony, which will be the chord of “E Minor 7.”

Our simple version will use notes that give this chord it’s principle color, (which we’ve already learned are the chord tones of the; Root, 3rd and 7th).

When it comes to the notes of our pattern for this “E Minor 7” chord, (located at the 5th string on the 7th fret), our shape will include the notes of the root of; “E, the minor 3rd of G and the minor 7th note of D.”


CHORD #4).
Our final chord pattern will be built from off of the harmony of the keys 5th chord-degree. In the key of “D Major” our 5th chord is the chord of “A Dominant 7th.”

For our simple fingering version, we’ll be using a shape for this chord that’s built off of the 6th guitar string in the 5th position.

When it comes to the notes of our chord pattern (of this, “A Dominant 7th” chord), we’ll have the notes of the root of; “A, the major 3rd of C# and the minor 7th tone of G.”





Example Progression:

For practice work on learning to play through the jazz progression I've shown below. It's the same jam that I play at the start of the video lesson.

click the image above to enlarge full-size





VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Hey, thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find.

The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense. So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

As always, if you enjoyed this lesson, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube...

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!


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