RHYTHM GUITAR 003: Rhythm Parts & Connecting Lines

April 20, 2018:
RHYTHM GUITAR 003:
Rhythm Parts and Connecting Lines

 
 NEW  The third lesson of "Rhythm Guitar" focuses on adding connecting lines in and around chord punches. Studies in this lesson will include performing connecting lines; after chords, before chords and within the middle of a measure.

The examples in lesson three will use several unique chord patterns including everything from triads to Dominant 11th quality chords and power chords. A "Rhythm Riffs Jam" is included to help students practice how to layer multiple rhythm parts. 



Members can watch the associated video lessons and download the handout, along with the MP3 clap/strum-a-long tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and MP3's. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons. Be sure to spend some additional time on learning the "Rhythm Jam Challenge" piece that I performed at the start of the lesson in the "Part One" video...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE:  In example one, a steady eighth-note feel establishes a country /folk progression in the key of "G Major." Chord punches are applied at the start of each measure. A follow up melody is performed after each chord.

In example two, a funk based groove is built upon busy sixteenth-notes. The connecting line melody occurs at the start of each measure. Follow up chords are of the "Dominant" chord quality, with all but one of them using extensions of an 11th.
 




PART TWO:
In example three, the riff is based upon the power chord being used to establish the measure at the start and end of each bar. In the middle of each measure, a connecting line based on notes of the "D Minor" pentatonic are used to format the tonal color of each bar.

Example four, applies connecting lines around Blues rhythm riffs. This style will often add melodic ideas using; Arpeggios, Pentatonic scale, as well as, Blues Scale connecting lines. The lines are played in and around Dominant chord punches. In example four, phrases from a key of "Bb Blues" progression are used to highlight the I, IV and V chords.

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Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtracks in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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Music Skills Aren't Growing? [HERE'S WHY]

Are you one of those guitar players who has trouble with their rate, pace and level of growth on the instrument? Quite often, along the learning curve, music students (and this certainly applies to guitar students), will feel like their growth and their skill development is happening exceptionally slow... 



Most of the time, the core of the problem is rooted within what the student is doing far too much of. Doing too much of the same style of playing, playing the same scales, and doing the same chords - day in - day out. It doesn't stretch the student to keep playing the same way every week of the month. Without variety, we cannot grow as musicians.

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STAGNANT STUDY:
For a lot of players, in far too many cases, there's simply way too much of the exact same thing being studied on a daily basis. When you do this, the level of musical exposure is far too limited. Due to the limited amount of new; styles, scales, chords and musical situations, the guitar players growth ends up stagnating. If this is allowed to continue for too long a period, months can go by with very little progress actually taking place.



TAKE LESSONS:
One of the reasons guitar students start taking lessons is to expand their horizons. And, getting high quality, well crafted material, that's logical and that follows a specific plan of growth over time is paramount. Because, on the flip side of this, if your guitar teacher starts every lesson by saying to you, "What Would You Like to Do Today," then... they're not doing their job as an instructor.

Good programs and good teachers will always offer their students a wide assortment of material, and that's what we need as practicing guitar players. Every music style you try, and every music theory principle you practice along the way, will slowly change you as a player.

Constant exposure to; new grooves, new chords, new scales, and new theory principles will open the door to new ways that you can use to apply ideas on your guitar. It's so valuable to you, that if you don't get this exposure, you can stagnate for years and years without any real noticeable progress.



NEW STYLES /NEW MUSIC:
I'd like you to try a few different stylistic concepts to help you better comprehend what I mean. For example, if you're a guitarist that only performs Folk songs, but, you've never tried playing any Funk grooves. Practicing some Funk would be a benefit for expanding your overall skill set.

The issue that would be a struggle in playing Funk would come down to the performance of Funk's 16th-note grooves. Most players who are locked into popular strumming ideas (familiar with Folk playing), generally have likely never had very much exposure to funky sixteenth note rhythms.

Here's an example of a Funky 16th-note groove that you can try. If you've been exposed to playing Funk in the past, it may not seem difficult. But, if you haven't ever tried Funk, this study will take some practice time to play.

FUNK RIFF:

 click the image above to expand full-screen


Another style of playing that is incredibly valuable, and makes a huge impact on your skill level is Jazz. A lot of guitarists will shy away from jazz because of the amount of major 7, minor 7 and dominant 7th chords used within it. Plus, there's all the chord extensions, and the scales you'll have to become familiar with.

But, learning jazz, (even learning a little bit of jazz), doesn't have to be that overwhelming. There are ways of side-stepping traditional Jazz music like Dixieland or Be-Bop. And, starting with other forms of the style.

There are also other Jazz styles that are full of really cool harmonies and opportunities to learn how to use unique scales. Smooth Jazz and Pop Jazz still apply many harmonies and lines that are unique, without that old-school style and influence from within traditional jazz.

As an example for you to try, here's a group of smooth-jazz chord changes that you can practice to help introduce you to the jazz sound.

SMOOTH JAZZ RIFF:

click the image above to expand full-screen



CONCLUSION:
Taking the time to learn how to play other styles of music will help expose you to different directions of playing faster than anything else out there. Doing this will also help get you to expand upon your abilities and become a far more well rounded musician.

The flip-side of this is that you never explore learning other types of guitar playing and your skill level stagnates. Although this is an easy path to fall into, (just playing music you're familiar with and there's no real effort involved with the songs), doing so does not push you to grow as a musician.

If you want to truly expand as a player playing the same stuff every day probably isn't a favorable avenue to take, since it severely limits your exposure to learning different rhythms, new scales, unique chords and new guitar techniques.

So, if you're feeling like Your Music Skills Aren't Growing... try branching out by exposing yourself to different styles of music... It really will do wonders for your guitar playing and your guitar technique.



VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Well, hey, thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be.

I've worked on developing these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program you'll ever find. The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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GUITAR TECHNIQUE 002: Chord Fingering Control (Basic)

April 015, 2018:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 002:
Chord Fingering Control (Basic)

 
 NEW  This unique Creative Guitar Studio course  explores exercises for increasing dexterity and coordination between the hands. The goal will be to increase mobility and control.

Guitar Technique topics will focus on hand skill for perfected movement. The desired results  include greater; clarity, agility, speed and accuracy of movement. 


Lesson two of Guitar Technique works through a collection of drills focused on developing better control when playing chord patterns of all types.

Members can watch both video lessons and download all of the handouts, along with the MP3 play-a-long tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE:  In example one, the exercise focuses on learning to better control fret-hand fingerings that are common in the pattern layouts of popular chord types.

This drill uses a collection of 2-note finger placement shapes to produce a total of eight fingering patterns.


Example two expands the eight pattern fingering drill from exercise one by using 3-note fretting to produce a collection of eight new 3-note fretting shapes.

These shapes (like the ones in exercise one) all operate within a single fingerboard position. 
 




PART TWO:
In example three, uses a structured musical format to help players better develop their use of 3-note chord patterns on the neck. The harmonic color of the progression is from the 5th mode of "D Major," (A Mixolydian mode).

Example four, operates from off of several standard major and minor triads as well as, inversions. The exercise stresses creating correct fingering /fretting. 


Emphasis is placed upon developing the proper feel for any "difficult reach or stretch" shapes - prior to building up the speed of your performance of the study.

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Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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Make Song Parts Better [THIS IS LAYERING]

Have you ever recorded your guitar thinking it played back too thin sounding? Did the recording that you made seem weak with far too little dynamics? This is an area of known of as "music production," and far too many players either never even consider it, or if they do they have no clear path to a step-by-system for making it happen with their songs...


A common complaint made by guitar players (generally those who are quite new to song production), will be that, regardless of where their song recordings were made - whether at home or in the studio, the song parts end up as sections that will come across performed like they're too thin and lacking in dynamics.



This is generally a concern that can cause a lot of frustration for players, (both when recording as well as, on stage). And, it's one that leaves a guitarist who's new to sound production, baffled as to how they can make their song parts sound fuller and richer.

So, whether you're new to recording, or if you're just trying to make your weekend jam band sound more impressive on stage, this episode of the Guitar Blog Insider is going to help you understand how to make your song parts sound better.

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STEP #1).
PRIMARY SONG PART:
This is the first idea that we end up having when we're creating music for a new song part. It can be thought of as our "primary" song section. This idea is generally the first composed segment of our song when we're writing our music.

The "Primary" song part could be a series of chords, or it might be a melody. Whichever category it falls into doesn't really matter, because all that we're worried about (at this point), is the very basics of what's going on musically. What is the harmony, the key signature and what style is it, (pop, rock, funk, jazz, blues, country, etc.).

To place things into context, let's say we had a pop-style chord progression composed within the key of "F Major." If this was our start - the first thing we composed - this would be our very first song section (primary Song Part)... Here's an example...

 click on the above image to enlarge full-screen




STEP #2).
CREATE LAYER ONE: A MELODIC BASS-LINE
Now that we have composed a primary song part, acting the start-point of our composition, our next step will be to form a secondary idea as a way to begin building up the impact of the primary part for the listener.

For our composition, we're going to think of this new secondary part as our first layer to build out the primary part, (keep in mind that, we don't want our final performance of the piece to come across as sounding too thin when we play it on stage or play it in the studio).

Below is an example of a bass-line melody than can act as a way to boost the effect of our primary part. Learn the bass-line and focus on how this melodic bass-line sounds (first on it's own), and then when played over the primary part. Keep in mind that this part can be performed on guitar, and is not meant as a replacement for the part played by a bassist in the band.

click on the above image to enlarge full-screen




STEP #3).
SECONDARY RHYTHM RIFF
Now that we've developed a bass-line idea (to help beef-up the low-end), we're going to move on to the upper register and compose a secondary rhythm riff (to help add more depth to the higher register sound).

Upper register riffs can be really cool, because they tend to act as a great way to help the composition start filling itself out in a new register. This works by not only blending in some brighter chord effects, but it also helps with the feel if you compose the new part so that it operates with a slightly different rhythmic accent.

This can help add a sense of a 'counter rhythm' against the original groove, making for a nice effect when everything is blended together on-stage or in the studio. Below is a "secondary rhythm riff" that I composed for another layer to be played over the parts that we've established so far.

click on the above image to enlarge full-screen




STEP #4).
ADDING A MID-REGISTER BOOST
One area that we haven't targeted yet is the mid-register sound. This can be thought of as either single-note ideas or, two-note chord ideas played more within the central string sets of 4th to 2nd string groups.

Mid-register song parts will often sound pretty cool if they're performed with a slightly busier groove to their rhythmic feel. When added, these mid-register ideas (along with all the others we've discussed) can work to build out a song section and create a production of a piece that sounds more filled out with several layers of counter rhythm feel and varied melodic color (due to the multiple harmonies created from all the different guitar parts).

So, here's an example that I created for this lesson, to function as a mid-register boost part... 

click on the above image to enlarge full-screen




REVIEW:
Let's do a quick re-cap of how this whole process functions to be able to add more life into song parts and to have them ultimately come across as sounding better to your audience.

First, there's the act of establishing your primary part. Then, once you have that, there's the creation of a bass-note melody line. And, then, there's the upper-register... /secondary riff idea. Then, finally there's the concept of adding that mid-register boost with a riff played upon the interior string sets.

Add it all together and you've got a much more sophisticated song production that'll really impress anyone listening to your music. With the new sections, the music will come across a lot more dynamic and they'll have a much fuller impression to the music's overall sound and structure.




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Well, I'd like to end the discussion by saying, thanks for joining me... If you want to learn more about what I do as an online guitar teacher, then head over to my website at creativeguitarstudio.com and sign up your FREE lifetime membership.

when you want more, you can always upgrade to either a Basic, or a Premium lesson package and start studying the guitar courses I've organized for the members of my website.

Also, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on all of this in the comment section below... if you enjoyed this video on YouTube please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more.

Thanks again and we'll catch up next week , for another episode of the, "Guitar Blog Insider."

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Qwik Songs #003: "How I Got to Memphis" by Bobby Bare


 NEW : Qwik Songs Series - Video (003)


Welcome to the new QwikSongs video lesson series. Lesson three covers the song, How I Got to Memphis by Bobby Bare... The Qwik-Songs videos are available in the members area. Includes PDF handout!

QwikSongs are available to members at Creative Guitar Studio.com. Lessons in the QwikSongs Series run through the structure of popular songs. This will include topics such as; harmonies, scales, song sections and guitar solos... 




Daily Deal:



Episode #003
"How I Got to Memphis" by Bobby Bare.


Section one works through the principle guitar riff. This part acts not only as an intro, but also as a background melody through the piece. Many variations of the part are performed, a general overview is outlined in section one.

Section two discusses the chord harmony and the harmonic movements from within the principle key of "D Major." Chord degrees of "I-IV and II" are used to establish the Verse and Chorus harmonies. 



Section three focuses on the Bridge. Here, the "V-chord" is used to push off the measures into the I-chord resolution.

Section four explores the half-step modulation that occurs within the piece. An interesting use of "Modal Interchange" is applied to transition the piece up to "Eb Major" and create a new harmony concept.

LISTEN
How I Got to Memphis: by Bobby Bare




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Sign into the website (or create your free members account) to join the members site. Sign up for the Basic Monthly or Premium (annual) membership to download the PDF handout for this lesson and study all of the other classes available on the website. 

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Do This After Every Guitar Lesson

Lets discuss the value of doing one thing, one important thing as a follow-up after anytime you finish-up doing a guitar lesson. And, it doesn't matter if it's a lesson that you took online through a membership web-site like mine. It could even be a lesson that you had just done by Skype, or a lesson that you attended locally in your home-town, (done face to face with your own private guitar instructor).



Doing the follow-up that I'm going to discuss here will do wonders for your overall skill building and for enhancing your learning curve. It'll help you better understand information and it'll help you better integrate topics that you are studying.

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Doing an, "After Lesson" follow-up:
When we study music in any way - in any capacity - we're going to get a lot more out of that lesson if we can spend some additional time after the class, doing what I like to call a "Wind-Down" from the topics covered. It's pretty much a review of what was studied in the lesson.

Often times, when we're learning new material in almost any style of music training, we're in a state of mind where we will (with that new material) rather quickly feel overwhelmed. There are generally a number of terms being thrown at us in a music class. There's chords, a series of finger motions we're likely unsure of, and there's rhythms to develop.

Learning music requires a sense of understanding about all new music theory topics that are being developed. Of all of the ideas you study, (while at guitar class with your instructor), it's almost guaranteed that there will be certain things that you will not fully comprehend. And, in many cases, that's why the winding down period you do immediately afterward - can be so valuable.




Putting this Idea into Context:
Time to put some context together here. Let's say that you just attended a guitar lesson, and you were studying the concept of Parallel Tonality. Often called, "Modal Interchange." At the lesson, your teacher explained what this process involves using several examples.

They explained how you can take a chord from the harmony of one tonality (like for example a chord from a Minor key), and place it into a progression that functions in the Major key. Maybe the teacher gave you an example of how a chord like; "Bb Major" could be added into a chord progression that was already established as being "D Major."

Perhaps your teacher also showed you how that chord could be used to do something unique, like modulate the progression up a half-step to the key of "Eb major." Now, during that lesson, do you honestly think that you would have fully comprehended all of that information in just one class?

Or, do you think that, after the lesson, you would have rather quickly started to forget things by the time that you finished the lesson, packed up and drove back home?



The "Wind-Down" [RE-LEARNING]:
This is where the "Wind Down" of information, that re-learning of the recently covered information (done immediately after your lesson), can become so incredibly valuable to you.

In the case of the topics I just mentioned, (from that example of studying Modal Interchange in a lesson), how would things be different if you, immediately after that lesson, went home and began breaking down (reviewing) everything your teacher was discussing.

If you would spend even 20 min. writing out the key of "D Major" and the key of "D Minor," and you calmly worked out how to take notice of where the "Bb Major" chord exists. And, if you played examples of adding that "Bb Major" chord into chord movements that are within "D Major," if you did that, what do you think would happen?

What would happen is you'd reach a new level of understanding during the wind-down because the information was so fresh in your mind. It would be a much better, deeper, much more effective use of your time, (not to mention a better investment of the money you just paid for that lesson).

If you spent even a short period - even 20 min. on doing a review like this, just to sit down right after the guitar lesson, and review all of the material, the learning experience would be greatly enhanced.



How to Execute the "Re-Learn" Process:
Here's a breakdown of specifically what I'm getting at of what you should do after your lesson to deepen the learning experience, and to essentially re-learn once more what was covered during your class.

Step (1).
Do NOT do anything else immediately after your lesson. Don't go to the movies with your friends, don't sit on the couch and watch TV, don't go for a pizza with the gang. Instead, go to your quiet practice room and just sit down for at least 20 min. and review everything that you just studied from your lesson.

Step (2).
Put pencil to paper. Grab a piece of staff-paper and write out harmonies you just studied. If you worked on chords, draw them on chord diagram paper. If you studied scales or arpeggios, write them out on fingerboard worksheet paper. Spend at least 5-7 min. on this part. There's something extremely beneficial about writing out material and staring at it, asking yourself what you do understand, and what you don't understand.

Step (3).
This method of re-learning after the lesson involves physically doing some more of what you covered at your lesson all over again. Whether that was a music reading study your teacher mentioned a few really good fingerings for. Or, if it was a lick, a solo section or a chord progression example... whatever it was, do it again, review it.

Keep in mind, this review doesn't have to be a heavy in-depth practice. In fact, I'd recommend that it wasn't. This period is just a review. Just a chance to bring up the information in your mind quickly one more time for a recall of the lesson details.

Once you've done this quick review method, you'll start to notice some really amazing benefits start coming along into your playing, through the rest of your week.



CONCLUSION:
As you can imagine, if you start doing this method of hitting your lesson material once again after the class for only 20 min. it's going to make a big difference for you. The intricate details of your lesson will all still be VERY fresh in your mind. Especially when it comes to the study of and the application of music theory. If you do this you'll start noticing some amazing ability begin happening when it comes to recall of important details that happened in your lesson.

Please understand that when you just leave a lesson, and you go off to do something else, your mind gets over-written with other information and other life details. But, when you hit the material again, right afterward, it's pretty incredible what kind of practice week that you're going to experience 2, 3, or 4 - 5 days after your session with your teacher.

So, I challenge you to try this, and then come back to this video in a week or two and leave your comments as to what you experienced when using this idea of executing an immediate review of the covered material, right after your guitar lesson!



VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Well, hey, thanks for joining me, If you'd like to Find Out What You Should Learn Next on Guitar - take a look at the courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

My step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses will cover what you need to know, along with how to be able to move forward and become the best player that you can be. I've worked on these courses since 1992 and I feel that all together they're the best guitar program that you'll ever find.

The courses will help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to the next level of guitar playing, in a very organized way, that makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com ...Until next time - take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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