RHYTHM GUITAR 016: Creating Rhythms (Blues)

October 19, 2018:
RHYTHM GUITAR 016:
Creating Rhythms (Rock)

 
 NEW  The 16th lesson of "Rhythm Guitar" shifts to a new practice routine that has the sessions start including composition. Each of the remaining Rhythm Guitar episodes will not only include stylistic examples, but they will also include a section for students to create their own original rhythm jams.

A bonus for BASIC and PREMIUM web-site members are the (9) MP3 play-along tracks that will help with learning each rhythm example. 



Paid Web-site members (BASIC and PREMIUM), can watch the associated video lessons and download the detailed PDF handout, along with the MP3 clap /strum play-along tracks...


Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and MP3's. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons. Be sure to spend some additional time on learning the "Rhythm Jam Challenge" piece that I performed at the start of the lesson in the "Part One" video...

EPISODE 16:
The lesson plan for episode 16 is dedicated to performing blues. Four examples in the lesson will focus on covering; Swung Finger-Picked Blues Rhythms, Dominant Chord Shuffle, Syncopated 16th-Note Blues, and a 6/8 Blues Rhythm Pattern.

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE (free on YouTube):  Example one is based upon a swung feel of the shuffle-rhythm. A steady eighth-note shuffle is mixed against eighth-note triplets to form a steady groove with strong accents on beats one and three.

PART TWO:  In example two, we're going to run through another 'Blues Shuffle' groove. This blues feel will focus on the use of Dominant 7th chord patterns performed around the traditional, "I-IV-V." 




PART THREE:
In example three, our groove shifts to the classic sounds of rhythms based upon the syncopated 16th-note blues feel. This groove is similar to the feel that was used profusely by, "Stevie Ray Vaughn."

The pattern used in example three is a single measure pattern based upon a recurring mix of 16th-notes and 8th-notes. This single bar groove establishes a rhythm pattern for the strum-hand that remains consistent throughout each bar.

 

PART FOUR:  Example four shifts to using the 6/8 time signature triple-meter rhythmic feel. This is also commonly referred to as, "compound meter."

This example operates around a two-bar groove that is based upon a mix of mostly 8th-notes as well as, a single quarter note in the second measure of the phrase.

The rhythm pattern shown in example four demonstrates a feel of  the, "triple meter," groove that applies consistent 8th-notes around the time signature of compound meter, (6/8 and 12/8).



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Paid members can download the handout along with the MP3 jamtracks in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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Unknown Chord Patterns (MADE EASIER)

If you’ve ever been stumped by an unknown looking chord called a 'slash chord,' then this lesson is going to be a great help to you. I will explain slash chords so you have a much better understanding for what chord inversions are and why they’re written on charts as slash chords... 




In this lesson I will take things a step further with those strange often unknown chords called "slash chords." 

This lesson will be unique because I will be showing you some of the most common open position slash chords that are used in nearly all types and all styles of music.

I will even have a 'real-world' slash chord progression for you to play that will include every one of the slash chord examples from this lesson.

WATCH THE VIDEO LESSON:



SLASH CHORDS:
In music, in order for a chord to exist, it must have at least a minimum of three notes, (otherwise it’s called an interval – not a chord).

ROOT POSITION:
Let’s take for example a “C Major” chord. It’s notes would be the; Root of “C,” the Major 3rd of “E” and the perfect 5th which would be a “G” note. 

These 3 tones make up the chord construction formula known of as a chords “1st, 3rd, and 5th.”


1st INVERSION:
If we take that chords 3rd degree note of “E” and place it into the bass, what we’d have is what’s referred to as a “First Inversion” of the “C Major” chord.
It would be written as “C / E.”




2nd INVERSION:
If we took the 5th chord tone of “G” and placed it into the bass, (playing “G” as the lowest pitch note of our chord), we’d have what’s referred to as a “Second Inversion” of “C Major” and it would be written as “C / G.”


The slash indicates that the chord name is shown on the left, (so in this case it’s a “C Major” chord), and that note shown (on the right side of the slash), is what the lowest pitch tone would have to be when the chord is performed on our instrument.




POPULAR SLASH CHORDS:
When it comes to playing slash chords on the guitar, there are a small group of patterns that seem to come up quite often. Some of the most common of them are shapes that you’ll find in the first position of the guitar neck.

These slash chords typically get included alongside of other popular first position and open position shapes. Let’s check out four of the most popular slash chords right now.

C MAJOR:
The first slash chord is a 2nd inversion “C Major,” it places the “G” (the 5th chord tone) in the bass.




F MAJOR:
The next one is an “F Major” in 2nd Inversion. This one takes the “F” chords 5th tone of “C” and places it as the lowest chord tone in the bass.




D MAJOR:
Another very common pattern is taking the 3rd of the open position “D Major” (which is the “F#”) and placing that F# into the bass, creating a “1st Inversion” “D Major chord.”




A MAJOR:
Another common chord inversion in the guitars open position is to take the open “A Major” chord and apply it as a first inversion, which changes it to become a 2nd pos. 1st inversion chord that places the chords “C#” into the bass.





SLASH CHORD APPLICATION:
I’ve taken all of these chord inversion patterns and I’ve composed a short chord progression using them so that you can not only practice how you can apply the inversions, but this will also help you better develop each of the shapes.




CONCLUSION:
Slash chords will show up in a lot of different songs. So, over time, it’s a really good idea to learn how to construct them yourself as a guitarist. In fact, just the other day one of my online students (who’s studying my courses on the web-site) emailed and asked me a question about a “Todd Rundgren” song called, “Hello it’s Me.”

In that song we find an “Abmaj7/Bb” chord listed in the chart at the end of the Verse.




Once you know your theory and you understand the ways that slash chords are applied on guitar, you’ll be able to better comprehend how to analyze and then play the correct shape for any slash chord (like that one), anywhere on the guitar’s fingerboard.



VISIT THE WEBSITE:
Hey, guys I want to let you know about the guitar courses I have over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

There are step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar courses available.

My courses work fantastic to help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that totally makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at my website; CreativeGuitarStudio.com

As always, thanks for joining me, if you liked this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more, (and remember to hit that bell when you subscribe so that you’ll never miss any of my lesson uploads on YouTube)…

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next video. Bye for now!

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GUITAR TECHNIQUE 015: Double & Triple Picking

October 14, 2018:
GUITAR TECHNIQUE 015:
Double and Triple Picking

 
 NEW  This unique Creative Guitar Studio course  explores exercises for increasing dexterity and coordination between the hands. The goal of the course is to increase awareness, mobility and control.


Lesson 015 of Guitar Technique explores the recurrent connected picking approach that is known as the "Double and Triple" picking method.

This picking style repeats the same note of a scale, interval or melody line in double or triple groupings. The result is a consecutive sounding pattern of picking that instantly establishes a perpetual driving guitar sound.

Developing this picking concept is not particularly difficult. The tough part is maintaining its persistent effect across a part. Getting good at this picking approach will require stamina and a relaxed /steady picking hand.

Practice the examples that are provided in the lesson plan to help establish your skill for solid control over both double and triple picking technique.
 

Paying members of the Creative Guitar website can watch both video lessons and download the PDF handout...




Join the member's area to download the PDF handout and start study of these exercises. Study all of the examples with full access to both video lessons...

Watch the Part One Video FREE on YouTube:



PART ONE: (Free on YouTube)
Exercise one works on a riff that applies a double picking concept over a 2-string scale idea. It helps in applying 2-string double picking with a goal of building stamina.


PART TWO:  Exercise two expands the double picking approach on guitar to include an open "A" 5th-string as a pedal tone. Open string pedal-tone technique is abundant in rock and metal. This idea also acts as a way to build a solid connection to the underlying key center.




PART THREE:
Exercise three moves into the practice of triple picking technique. The triple picked exercise operates in compound meter (12/8 time) and focuses on phrasing a triple picked rock phrase in the key of "D Minor."


PART FOUR:  Exercise four introduces a triple picked phrase for blues that operates within a blues boogie. This riff is once again within the compound meter time signature of 12/8 time. The key signature is "F Blues."

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Paid members can download the handout in the members area at: CreativeGuitarStudio.com

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The Dom7 Chord Can Do What? (SURPRISE!)

How much do you know about using “Dominant 7th” chords? These chords can be used in pretty surprising ways. This lesson breaks down a very cool process for applying Dominant 7th's that most guitar players are totally unaware of...




For a lot of guitar players the "Dominant 7th" chord is a "Blues" chord, or it's a "Jazz" style chord. They seem to behave as if they’re just simply replacing major chords in many situations.

Other times, the Dominant 7th will show up in places where it does make make a whole lot of sense, (even if you have a basic understanding of chord harmony).

When these chords are used in unique ways, they still seem to sound quite good. Why is that?

In this lesson I’m going to help you better understand what exactly a “Dominant 7th” chord is, what it’s chord formula is, and what kind of relationship it has to the diatonic scale.

WATCH THE VIDEO:




WHAT IS A DOMINANT 7TH CHORD?
This chord is half major and half minor. It contains 4-tones, and if we analyzed how a Dominant 7th chord would be built from off of the root of “C” we would find that we’d get the Root Note, (C) a “Major 3rd” (E) a “Perfect 5th” (G) and a “Minor 7th.” Of (Bb). For that C7 chord type, again - the specific notes would wind up as “C, E, G and a, “Bb.”



CHORD PATTERNS ON THE NECK:
Here’s what that chord would look like if we played it in the 3rd position…



Here’s what it would look like if we played it in the 8th position…




Finally, here’s what that would look like if we played it in the 5th position…



Now that you understand the chord tones, the chord degrees of each interval that creates the “Dom.7” chord, and now that you’re familiar with some chord shapes… we can start learning the different ways of how this chord is applied.




DIATONIC HARMONY APPLICATION:
The first and most common application of this chord is generally using it as a “Diatonic” 5-chord that naturally exists within a major key.

This means that if we have a chord progression in the key of “C Major” we would find a “Dominant 7th” chord naturally existing upon that keys 5th step of “G.”

In this case we would refer to this idea as using the “Dominant 7th” as a “Primary” chord of the harmony. A typical Diatonic application in the key of “C” would work like this…






NON-DIATONIC HARMONY:
Alright, so now here’s where things are going to get to be a little bit of a surprise for a lot of you... Remember, earlier on I had said that a “Dominant 7th” chord is half major and half minor… that’s because they have both a major 3rd and a minor 7th interval within the chord tone structure.

This also means that aside from this chord functioning in its “Diatonic” “Primary” state, it can also function as a replacement for any other diatonic chord, (regardless of whether that chord might normally exist in harmony as a Major or a Minor within the key signature).

As an example of how we might go ahead and apply this, let’s take that chord progression we just played and replace the “Em” chord (in the second measure), with an “E dom.7” chord so that you can hear how this secondary dominant concept would be applied in that progression…




SONG APPLICATIONS:
If you want to go and check out some real applications of the use of Secondary Dominant chords, you won’t need to look very far. They show up in a ton of different songs. You can perhaps start by having a listen to the song called, “I Can’t Tell You Why” written by the Eagles.

The Verse chord changes:




That piece is in the key of “D Major,” and in that songs 1st Verse we find simple chord changes that are fairly limited to using the two chords of; “D maj.” and, “G maj.” However, at the end of the verse, we find a chord from the key operating as a Secondary Dominant…

In that song the diatonic 3-chord of “F# Minor” is replaced at the end of the Verse with an “F#7”. And, later on in that song, the Bridge has the same situation occur once again in the same way.

Now, something else interesting is that the “F# dom.7th” chord is actually preceded by an “F#7sus4” so keep an idea like that in mind if you’re perhaps doing some composing using this theory on your own as well.

Another song you might want to look into is a song called, “Spooky” by the Atlanta Rhythm Section. That song’s in the key of “E Minor” and it uses a simple two chord riff that replaces the Diatonic IV-chord of “A Minor” with a Secondary Dominant application of “A dom.”

Also, in that piece, the dominant chord is performed with an extension of a 13th. The riff goes from an “Em7” chord and moves into an “A dom. 13th.”




CONCLUSION:
There are quite a lot of different ways that these secondary dominant chords can be applied, but one thing is for certain. Any step of the scale for any key that you might be; writing, arranging or transcribing within (any step) can be performed as a Dominant 7th chord (it does not have to always be played as the correct diatonic major or minor).

At any time in any song, if it sounds good, you can replace a diatonic major or minor chord with a “Dominant 7th chord.” And, it can be played along with any suspension or extension that you would like!



VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
As always, thanks for joining me, if you liked this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube, (remember to hit that bell when you subscribe so that you’ll never miss any of my lesson uploads to YouTube).

Also, I'd like to let you know about the guitar courses over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar course available. The courses work to help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that makes sense.

So, I look forward to helping you further at CreativeGuitarStudio.com

Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now! 

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GET SOLOING: Phrasing by Numbers

You've heard of "Painting by Numbers," well now there's "Soloing by Numbers." Learn to play great solos by understanding how to phrase into intervals of chords, (in other words, phrasing into chord tones). 

When you get good at this method, it can become an incredibly powerful way to get your solos to really pop out. 



"Phrasing by Numbers" (phrasing into the chord tones), takes a special kind of practice to be able to get your mind zeroed in on. The practice routine involves using specific intervals so that the choice of notes (you play into), will eventually become more natural and automatic for you.

After practicing using this method for a while, your hands will just naturally, "go to where you need them to go," and you won’t need to consciously think about it.

WATCH THE VIDEO:




STEP 1). ESTABLISH A JAM-PROGRESSION

Let’s get things started by laying the foundation for our exercise…

Here’s a two chord jam in the key of “E Minor.” This progression applies the chords of, “Em7” and “Bm7.”

The Jam:





STEP 2). PLAN THE NUMBERS
In our two chord jam (from the key of “E Minor”) we’re going to begin our practice routine by phrasing a melodic statement into different resolution tones from the “Bm7” chord.

This means that each phrase we complete will point into a different chord tone of “Bm7.”

The end goal of this style of practice is for your ear to eventually get your hands to start recognizing two things.

The first is the location on the neck for each chord tone, and secondly, what it sounds like to land on the different intervals of the chord being targeted.

CHORD TONE TARGETING:
The “Bm7” chord has four chord tones, they are the; Root of “B,” the Minor 3rd of “D,” the Perfect 5th of, “F#,” and the Minor 7th of, “A.”

NOTE: Keep in mind that when using this practice approach you’re going to need to do a note by note breakdown of each chord that you use in your routine. 



PRACTICE TIP:
You’ll always need to be aware of the chord tones which will get used as the target tones. However, the good news is that after a while, your ear will surprisingly start to take over and target all of those chord tones unconsciously. I know this sounds unreal, but it actually does happen this way. 





STEP 3). START SOLOING BY NUMBERS
Let’s have some fun and start this exercise… Study the four-bar melodic phrase shown below. It covers the “Em7” chord with a repetitive committed musical line (just for that chord).

The study repeats the same phrase on each pass of that ‘Em7.’ But, for the resolution into the “Bm7” chord the study is going to target into different chord tones on each repeat.

Those will be, (just to re-cap), the; Root (B), the Minor 3rd (D), the Perfect 5th (F#), and the Minor 7th (A)… Now, start jamming out and play this exercise.









CONCLUSION:
Well, that’s the “Phrasing by Numbers,” exercise and when you start doing it as a part of your soloing practice, you’ll begin noticing results in around 2-3 weeks’ time.

It really doesn’t take all that long. But, what’s really cool (about studying a chord tone exercise like this one), is that you’ll not only get a lot better at your ability to play really well connected solos, but your music theory will also get a lot better too. 

Along the way you’ll be analyzing chord tones so much more in depth to be able to target the different intervals of every new chord you try. 




VISIT THE WEB-SITE:
Before we wrap-up I wanted to let you know about the guitar courses that I have over on my website at CreativeGuitarStudio.com.

I’ve got step-by-step; Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced courses that work alongside of in-depth elective programs to form the best guitar courses available.

My courses work fantastic to help you learn to identify what's required to get you up to that next level of guitar playing, in a very organized step-by-step way, that totally makes sense.

I look forward to helping you further at my website; CreativeGuitarStudio.com
 



Thanks for joining me, if you liked this lesson, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe for more on YouTube, (and remember to hit that bell when you subscribe so that you’ll never miss any of my lesson uploads to YouTube)… Until next time, take care and we'll catch up again on the next lesson. Bye for now!

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