Develop Scales Better /Faster using Scale Sequences...


By David Mason

Scale fragments performed as sequences...
 
All of this stuff comes from beginning violin books - it's no wonder they can play like that!



SEQUENCING:

1-2-3, 2-3-4, 3-4-5, 4-5-6, 5-6-7, 6-7-8 ...etc...
ascending triplets going up

6-7-8, 5-6-7, 4-5-6, 3-4-5, 2-3-4, 1-2-3 ...etc...
ascending triplets going down

3-2-1, 4-3-2, 5-4-3, 6-5-4, 7-6-5, 8-7-6 ...etc...
descending triplets going up

8-7-6, 7-6-5, 6-5-4, 5-4-3, 4-3-2, 3-2-1 ...etc...
descending triplets going down

1-2-3-4, 2-3-4-5, 3-4-5-6, 4-5-6-7, 5-6-7-8, 6-7-8-9 ...etc...
ascending 4's going up

6-7-8-9, 5-6-7-8, 4-5-6-7, 3-4-5-6, 2-3-4-5, 1-2-3-4 ...etc...
ascending 4's going down

4-3-2-1, 5-4-3-2, 6-5-4-3, 7-6-5-4, 8-7-6-5, 9-8-7-6 ...etc...
descending 4's going up

9-8-7-6, 8-7-6-5, 7-6-5-4, 6-5-4-3, 5-4-3-2, 4-3-2-1 ...etc...
descending 4's going down

1-3-5, 2-4-6, 3-5-7, 4-6-8, 5-7-9, 6-8-10 ...etc...
ascending chord triplets going up

5-3-1, 6-4-2, 7-5-3, 8-6-4, 9-7-3, 10-6-8 ...etc...
descending chord triplets going up

1-3-5-7, 2-4-6-8, 3-5-7-9, 4-6-8-10, 5-7-9-11 ...etc...
ascending chord 4's going up

11-9-7-5, 10-8-6-4, 9-7-5-3, 8-6-4-2, 7-5-3-1 ...etc...
descending chord 4's going down


HARMONIZING:
Each note can be harmonized in 3rds, 4ths, 5ths and 6ths; and 2nds and 7ths too, (but not too often).

To harmonize in 3rds, play the scale tone, and the 3rd scale tone above it. For example; "C and an E," then "D and an F." Using the system, it would go; 1+3, 2+4, 3+5, 4+6 etc.

Check out Duane Allman & Dickey Betts intro. on "Blue Sky"



Dickie Betts would play a lick over and over, then Duane Allman would add harmonies in thirds - two scale tones higher:

Dickie: 1-2-3-4, 2-3-4-5, 1-2-3-4, 2-3-4-5, 1-2-3-4, 2-3-4-5
Duane: 3-4-5-6, 4-5-6-7, 3-4-5-6, 4-5-6-7, 3-4-5-6, 4-5-6-7

To harmonize in 4ths, you can skip up two scale tones; 1+4, 2+5, 3+6, 4+7 etc.

In 5ths; 1+5, 2+6, 3+7, 4+8....

In 6ths; 1+6, 2+7, 3+8, 4+9 (9=2 up an octave)

 

2 comments:

  1. I just want to add - it makes "practicing scales" useful, interesting and MUSICAL. I can only think of couple of instances where a melody zips up or down a whole octave scale, and it's as a connector, not a structural building block. Whereas these bits are EVERYWHERE in songs. Just pick one of 'em, one little corner, and work on it for several minutes. Add rests, half-notes, skip around... It may well become hard to stop, which is what happens when you're playing music instead of exercises.And THAT distinction is just a little switch inside your OWN head. Always play music.

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